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  • Author or Editor: C. Le Pairs x
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Abstract  

The Netherlands university system encompasses roughly one half of the state financed research enterprise. Some characteristics and data on the field of education and present occupation of the professional staff in this system are given and conclusions are drawn concerning field mobility and mutual influencing of different disciplines.

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Abstract  

The merits and shortcomings of bibliometric evaluation techniques are well known; the reliability of the techniques varies according to the discipline. For technology the reliability is small. The electron microscope is a clear case of extreme mismatch between the number of citations received and the impact of the instrument in a wide area of science. The instrument is comparable to a scientific publication in the way in which it is used and referred to in the literature. In this paper we estimate the size of the citation gap, i.e. the number of citations an author misses because the results of his research are made public in the form of an instrument instead of via an article in a journal.

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Abstract  

Document cocitation analysis, as developed by Small and Griffith, was employed as a means of assessing current Dutch participation in science. The method compared overall Dutch published contributions to science (1–2%) with the percentage of Dutch papers in both the cited cores of clusters and the citing margins of clusters (newly published papers). It was possible to identify clusters ranging form ones with strong Dutch participation to those without Dutch cited or citing papers. The method may help policymakers to detect areas of special concern. The technique can be used for any nation, but may be particularly helpful for the smaller developed countries. We consider the ideal distribution of scientific productivity for those countries.

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Abstract  

Field switchers are an interesting group of people to study if one wants to find out to what extent and the ways in which the various scientific disciplines influence each other. In this paper we present and discuss the results of an inquiry that was conducted at Dutch universities among one particular type of field switchers, namely migrated physicists. By migrated physicists we mean physicists working in universities but not in physics departments. Although migrated physicists form a very heterogenous group one can draw some general conclusions about their attitudes, characteristics and capacities. Migrated physicists apparently continue to feel themselves to be physicists, and they think that physics or natural sciences should play a greater role in their adopted fields. At least in the case of physicsts, field-mobility seems to be linked with general mobility Migrant parform a useful and important sevice.

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