Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Dániel Ittzés x
Clear All Modify Search

The author's intention is to prove that the poetic structure of Callimachus' Hymn to Apollo is in fact a realisation of Apolline aesthetics. While perfecting divine art and poetry, however, the poet does not become conceited, unlike mythical figures such as Arachne, Marsyas or Thamyris. It is this trait that compels Apollo to push his own envy off the cliffs of Olympus, and declare his benevolence towards the Apolline poet.

Restricted access

This paper has been intended to describe the influence of an archaeological source and a literary source on Horace's ode Dive, quem proles. The author intends to prove that Horace has composed the ode as if he was walking from the portico to the cult statue in the Temple of Apollo on the Palatine. In the second part of the paper the parallel motifs of the second Callimachean Hymn and the Horatian poem, e.g. mimesis, hybris, are analysed.

Restricted access

Horace’s ode Dianam tenerae… used to be interpreted with regard to Catullus’ Hymn to Diana. Through the analysis of the parallel motifs and the differences of both poems, the traditional elements and the “accessories” of the hymnic tradition adapted and rewritten by Horace are illustrated and clarified. While answering the questions concerning the genre, the “literary I” and the lexis of the ode, it becomes obvious, that Horace’s main intention was to utter his vocation as vates and the effect of his poem. Thus, it is not Apollo ἀλεζíκακgoς, but the self-conscious poet, who is in the centre of the carm . I 31.

Restricted access