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  • Author or Editor: D. Butkus x
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Abstract  

Changes in volumetric activity of 85Kr radioactive inert gas take place in the atmosphere: it has increased by around 50% during the past 15 years. The main source of such gas is the operation of nuclear power plants and spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. 85Kr as an inert gas spreads throughout the entire atmosphere and its ionizing radiation may result in changes of atmospheric electric phenomena. Therefore it is necessary to control 85Kr emission into the atmosphere. However, there is no effective method for this as inert gases, under normal conditions, can hardly be adsorbed in different adsorbents and stored in special containers for a long period of time. This paper tries to show the possibility of keeping 85Kr longer within the adsorbent by changing its aggregate state: gas is adsorbed into liquid adsorbent and desorption takes place from solid adsorbent. For this purpose, an epoxy resin is used which, after adding a special hardener at room temperature, turns into a solid material with density of around 1.2 × 103 kg m−3. As a result of sample blending with substances which contribute to better solubility of 85Kr, diffusion coefficient of this gas (i.e. desorption speed) changes within the adsorbent in the solid state.

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Abstract  

Soil and meadow grass were sampled in the whole territory of Lithuania in 1992–2000. For the laboratory experiment, spring wheat Triticum aestivum L. “Nandu” was used because its root system type is similar to that of perennial meadow grass. The 137Cs soil-to-plant transfer factor of spring wheat was determined and the results were compared with the predicted values using a compartment model of soil-to-plant transfer and with the results of the field experiment. The results of comparing the measured and calculated transfer factor using the model show rather good coincidence, however, the calculated values were overestimated. The reason for overestimation can be that the uptake rate is not influenced only by the soil-to-plant transfer. The results of the model experiment (from 0.005 m2·kg−1 to 0.053 m2·kg−1) are close to those of the field measurements for grass (from 0.013 m2·kg−1 in 1992–1995 to 0.10 m2·kg−1 in 1999–2000).

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