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  • Author or Editor: D. Hayes x
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Abstract  

A small, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) equipped with sensors for physical and chemical measurements of remote environments, is described. A miniature helicopter airframe is used as a platform for sensor testing and development. The sensor output is integrated with the flight control system for real-time, interactive, data acquisition and analysis. Pre-programmed flight missions will be flown with several sensors to demonstrate the cost-effective surveillance capabilities of this new technology.

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Abstract  

Fluoride (F) binding to humic acid has been measured as a function of pH (5–6.6). The pH dependent binding is attributed to the anion being trapped within the large structure (territorial bound) but is not bound to a particular functional group (site bound). Studying fluoride binding provides insight to cation, anion and neutral species interactions with humic acid.

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Abstract  

The magnesium-cerium system has been partially revised in the Ce-rich and Mg-rich regions by using results obtained with the Smith thermal analysis (STA) technique. Nine alloys were examined and, after the thermal measurements,were subjected to phase analysis by means of X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), optical(LOM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA).The coordinates of the invariant reactions, many of them very close to each other, were established and compared with literature data where a call for a deeper investigation was proposed as the thermal values were open to different interpretations.

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Abstract  

A number of nuclear technologies developed and applied at the Savannah River Site in support of nuclear weapons material production and environmental remediation can be applied to problems in law enforcement. Techniques and equipment for high-sensitivity analyses of samples are available to identify and quantify trace elements and establish origins and histories of forensic evidence removed from crime scenes. While some of these capabilities are available at local crime laboratories, state-of-the-art equipment and breakthroughs in analytical techniques are continually being developed at DOE laboratories. Extensive experience with the handling of radioactive samples at the DOE labs minimizes the chances of cross-contamination of evidence received from law enforcement. In addition to high-sensitivity analyses, many of the field techniques developed for use in a nuclear facility can assist law enforcement personnel in detecting illicit materials and operations, in retrieving of pertinent evidence and in surveying crime scenes. Some of these tools include chemical sniffers, hand-held detectors, thermal imaging, etc. In addition, mobile laboratories can be deployed to a crime scene to provide field screening of potential evidence. A variety of portable sensors can be deployed on vehicle, aerial, surface or submersible platforms to assist in the location of pertinent evidence or illicit operations. Several specific nuclear technologies available to law enforcement and their potential uses are discussed.

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