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Abstract  

When an aqueous solution of Na2[Mo(V)2O4EDTA] (ethylene diamine tetraacetate) was photolyzed in the presence of excess KBr and K2S2O8 at neutral pH, the complex was found to be oxidized due to the reactions of Br 2 –. and SO 4 –. , respectively. Oxidation of the complex was also observed due to the reactions of the complex with radiolytically generated Br 2 –. and SO 4 –. radicals. When the oxidation of the complex with SO 4 –. was conducted in an unbuffered solution, a chain reaction was observed in the oxidation of the complex. The time resolved kinetics for the formation and decay of different transient intermediates and the relevant rate constants were investigated with a flash photolysis technique, and a probable mechanism for the oxidation process was given.

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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors:
K. Devika
,
R. Chandrika
,
Srirupa Mukherjee
,
D. Padmanabhan
,
V. K. P. Unny
, and
N. Sivaprasad

Summary  

Tritiated uracil and uridine have been prepared simultaneously from a mixture of their respective halogenated analogues (5-bromouracil and5-bromouridine) by halogen-tritium exchange in a one pot preparation, followed by purification. The tritiated products thus obtained have specific activities of 0.962 TBq/mmol and 1.036 TBq/mmol, respectively.

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European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology
Authors:
Gangadhararao Appana
,
Dipankar Das
,
Maroudam Veerasami
,
Ramachandran Lakshmikanthan Senthilkumar
,
Munishkumar Durishetty
,
B. Ramalakshmi
,
Vijay Bahekar
,
Falguni Mukherjee
,
Dev Chandran
,
P. Uday Kumar
,
B. Sesikeran
, and
Dr. Villuppanoor Alwar Srinivasan Ph.D.

Abstract

A male cattle calf was detected as subclinically and naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) by a series of antemortem and postmortem tests. The MAP infection was identified by strong antibody and cell-mediated immune (CMI) response by a commercial ELISA kit and an intradermal Johnin test, respectively, in the initial antemortem examination. The antemortem status of the calf was further confirmed by MAP-specific interferon gamma (IFN-γ) response. For detection of IFN-γ response, MAP-specific IFN-γ release assays (IGRAs): (a) immuno capture ELISA (IC-ELISA) and (b) ELISPOT was employed. In addition, the presence of intracellular cytokine IFN-γ was detected by flow cytometry. For all cytokine assays, MAP-specific recombinant antigens HSP65 and 35 kDa were employed to overcome the poor sensitivity and specificity resulting from the use of Johnin, the crude protein purified derivative of MAP. Postmortem examination of the MAP-infected/suspected cattle calf did not reveal any pathognomonic gross lesions in the gastro-intestinal tract. Histopathological examination of multiple organs showed the presence of epithelioid cells/macrophages and edematous lesions in the mesenteric lymph nodes suggestive of MAP; however, no granulomas were observed in the intestinal tract. The necropsy samples of rectum and mesenteric lymph nodes were positive for isolation of MAP by culture in the BACTEC™ MGIT™ 960 system, and acid fast bacilli were demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy confirming the infection. Due to differential and complex expression patterns of MAP antigens reported in literature, a combination of assays such as those based on IGRAs and antibody detection is essential. Therefore, the current experimental evidence confirms the efficacy of the approach adopted. However, further studies will be needed to understand the optimal combination MAP-specific antigens for use in IGRAs or antibody assays that can be used for detecting MAP infection in every stage of the disease.

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