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Thermal properties of Jojoba wax

II. Oxidation behaviour by differential scanning calorimetry

Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors:
V. González-González
and
E. Campos-López

The thermo-oxidative stability of Jojoba wax (Simmondsia chinensis) was studied by differential scanning calorimetry in a dynamic oxygen atmosphere. The thermo-oxidation activation energy (Ea) was calculated by determining the maximum reaction temperature (Tm) at different heating rates (Hr) and using mathematical models previously proposed for dynamic systems. The value obtained was 21.84 Kcal/mol. The oxidation enthalpiesδH ox were also calculated and a lineal relationship was found with the square root of the heating rate and the initial temperature of thermo-oxidation

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Thermal properties of jojoba wax

I. Crystallization behaviour

Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors:
V. González-González
,
R. O. Valero-Coss
, and
E. Campos-López

The thermal behaviour of Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) liquid wax was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), varying the annealing conditions. The fusion enthalpy (ΔHf) of the unannealed material was 27.1 cal/g; the relationship between heat capacity (Cp) and temperature could be expressed by the following equation:Cp=9.51×10−4 T+0.129. It was found that Jojoba wax presents four endothermic transitions (α, β, γ andδ) including fusionα, estimable at low heating rates (1 K/min); the activation energies (Ea) for transitionsα andγ were 51.18 and 64.82 Kcal/mole respectively; and it was observed that the transition temperaturesα andγ maintained a lineal relationship with the square root of the heating rate (Hr).

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Abstract  

The thermal behavior of hydrogels synthesized by solution polymerization between acrylamide, acrylic acid and diglycidyl acrylate (DGA) as a crosslinking agent was investigated. The structure of the hydrogel can be tightly controlled with the reaction temperature. This method produces a new type of hydrogels, which exhibit well defined structures at various scales of length simultaneously. These multi-structured hydrogels are hydrophilic, elastic, water insoluble, and soft polymers with an anisotropic optical response. The structure was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), polarized light microscopy (PLM) and macroscopic visualization (CCD camera). In addition, structural transitions in the hydrogels were monitored by temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC). Severe heating tests in an adiabatic oven were performed to analyze decomposition of the material. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to qualitatively analyze the hydrogels samples exposed to a sudden thermal treatment.

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