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Concentrations of potentially toxic elements were determined in the soil solution of two soils (acidic sandy and slightly acidic clay loam) treated with phosphate rocks having high Cd content in a pot experiment. Relative concentrations characterizing the mobility of metals (expressed as soil solution concentrations in percentage of their “total” amounts in the phosphate rock-treated soil) decreased with increasing phosphate rock rates in the sandy soil. Mn@Sr>Cd@Co were the most, while Pb and Cr the least mobile elements. The relative concentrations in the clay loam soil were much lower than in the sandy soil and they practically remained constant with increasing phosphate rock rates. It was concluded that in the experimental time frame the environmental risk did not increase with the increase of phosphate rock rate. 

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Agrokémia és Talajtan
Authors: Katalin Sárdi, P. Csathó, I. Sisák, E. Osztoics, P. Szűcs, and Á. Balázsy
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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: K. Végh, E. Osztoics, P. Csathó, J. Csillag, L. Radimszky, G. Baczó, M. Magyar, T. Takács, A. Lukács, and M. Karátsonyi
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Agrokémia és Talajtan
Authors: Péter Csathó, E. Osztoics, J. Csillag, T. Lengyel, L. Gonda, L. Radimszky, G. Baczó, M. Magyar, K. R. Végh, M. Karátsonyi, T. Takács, A. Lukács, and T. Németh

Depending on their origin, sedimentary phosphate rocks (PRs) may differ in their P solubility, and, as a consequence, in their agronomic effectiveness. The effect of six phosphate rocks (PR) - originating from Algeria (ALG), North Florida (FLO), North Carolina (NCA), Senegal (SEN) Morocco (MOR) and Hyperphosphate (HYP) with various P solubility (evaluated by 2% formic acid, 2% citric acid, and neutral ammonium citrate) - as well as single superphosphate (SSP) and superphosphate + lime (SSP + Ca) (each P source on 4 P levels, with doses of 0, 100, 400 and 1600 mg P 2 O 5 ·kg -1 soil) on the shoot yield of tillering stage spring barley, soil available P (i.e. H 2 O, Olsen, Bray1, Lakanen-Erviö (LE) and ammonium lactate (AL) extractable P contents) were studied in pot experiments set up with acidic sandy soil (Nyírlugos, Hungary) and acidic clay loam soil (Ragály, Hungary), both with low P supplies.  The average spring barley shoot yield at the beginning of shooting was 95% higher on the colloid-rich acidic (pH KCl : 4.5) clay loam soil than on the colloid-poor acidic (pH KCl : 3.8) sandy soil. The differences in the solubility of phosphate rocks showed close correlation to the differences in P responses. On both soils, the correlation between total PR-P added and P responses in spring barley shoot yield was much weaker than that between neutral ammonium citrate soluble PR-P added and P responses in spring barley shoot yield. When phosphate rocks were applied as P sources, the comparison of soil test P methods showed a different picture on the two soils. In the case of the acidic sandy soil (Nyírlugos), the strongly acid LE-P (r² = 0.83) and AL-P (r² =0.74) tests gave the highest correlation coefficients with spring barley responses to P, while on the acidic clay loam soil (Ragály) these were achieved by the Olsen-P (r² = 0.88) and Bray1-P (r² =0.88) methods. 

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