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  • Author or Editor: E. Sárváry x
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Abstract

Hepatitis C (HCV) is one of the main causes of liver transplantation (OLT). Previously we have reported that high serum C RNA level correlates with the severity of histopathological signs and poor clinical outcome. The core antigen of virus C is known to interfere with chaperones in the hepatocytes, results in an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In this study HCV positive liver transplanted patients were evaluated, whether there are correlations among chaperone expression, recurrence and viral titer. Patients were enrolled after surviving the first month following OLT. Sera were collected regularly, and biopsies were taken on demand following OLT. The diagnosis of recurrent HCV was proven by Knodell-Ishak scoring. In this case ribavirin+interferon were initiated, and maintained for one year. All chaperones were upregulated in the transplanted liver graft showing recurrent hepatitis C disease. ATF6, GP96, GRP78, CNX and CLR chaperones were upregulated significantly compared to their levels in normal livers. Except for one chaperone, the level of upregulation did not correlate with the serum's HCV-RNA titre: the only difference between Group1 and 2 (RNA titre above and below 8.78 106 respectively) was that the level of ATF6 was 1.6 times higher in Group1 compared to Group2. The expression of all chaperones was reduced, and some even became downregulated after the interferon treatment. In accordance with the literature our results suggest that hepatitis C might induce apoptosis through ER-stress. Those cells exposed to a high C viral load, had a lower chance to be eliminated.

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Authors: Balázs Nemes, D. Görög, I. Fehérvári, T. Mándli, E. Sárváry, L. Kóbori, A. Doros and J. Fazakas

Abstract

Portal vein reconstruction might be a challenge in certain cases of liver transplantation. The problem usually arises due to small vessels in pediatric transplantation and/or living related donor and split liver transplantation, or as a result of extensive PVT in adult recipients. Authors report a case of a 60-year-old alcoholic cirrhotic patient with reverse portal flow. The standard end to end portal anastomosis did not work well, so a mesoportal shunt with a donor iliac vein conduit was performed first, followed by a cavoportal hemitransposition. After unsuccessful attempts of providing good portal flow, the donor umbilical vein and the iliac conduit was used for portal flow reconstruction as meso-Rex graft. The patient has been doing fine for eight months after her liver transplantation. Unusual types of portal reconstructions consist of meso-portal, umbilico-portal, renoportal anastomoses that are primarily used as rescue techniques. However, it is rare that one has to use them sequentially in the same patient.

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Authors: Enikő Sárváry, Zs. Gerlei, E. Dinya, E. Tóth, M. Varga, R. Chmel, M. Molnar, A. Remport, B. Nemes, L. Kobori, D. Görög, J. Fazakas, I. Gaal, J. Járay, F. Perner and R. Langer

Abstract

Patients on hemodialysis (HD) and renal transplant recipients (RT) have a high prevalence of HCV infection. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of HCV-RNA in the anti-HCV positive patients and to compare the biochemical parameters of PCR(+) and PCR(−) subgroups. Methods: The 525 sera were screened for anti-HCV. HCV-RNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and liver enzymes [SGOT, SGPT, GGT, α-glutathione S-transferase (GST)] were measured. Results: Active viraemia was found only in 187 of 289 (65%) seropositive HD patients in contrast to 53 of 53 (100%) of seropositive RT patients. Significantly increased (p<0.05) GST values (9.9 μg/l) were found in the PCR(+) subgroups compared to GST levels (2.7 μg/l) of the PCR(−) subgroups. Elevated GST concentration was found in 80% (208/251) of PCR(+) patients. The measured enzymes were not elevated in HCV infected patients. Six percent of HD and 11% of RT patients were screened before seroconversion. Diagnostic sensitivity (80%) and specificity (79%) of GST were calculated as good for early liver damage caused by HCV. In contrast, the sensitivity of the measurement of other liver enzymes were very weak (SGOT: 8%; SGPT: 10%; GGT: 42%). Conclusion: The significantly higher viraemia of the RT subgroup could be related to the immunosuppressive therapy. Increased GST level may be a useful indicator of tissue damage during HCV infection. If HCV infection is suspected, PCR and GST measurement should be performed, even if anti-HCV result is negative.

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