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The addition of the synthetic Rhagoletis lure (consisting of ammonium carbonate and ammonium acetate, developed previously for Rhagoletis cerasi L.) to fluorescent yellow sticky traps invariably increased catches of the European cherry fruit fly (R. cerasi), eastern cherry fruit fly (R. cingulata Loew.), walnut husk fly (R. completa Cresson) and the sunflower maggot (Strauzia longipennis Wiedemann). Thus in detection and monitoring surveys, where sensitivity of the trap is highly important, the use of traps with synthetic lure added is strongly recommended. Results of the present study with S. longipennis suggest that the synthetic Rhagoletis lure can be useful also in trapping non-Rhagoletis tephritid flies in future research efforts.

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The addition of the synthetic Rhagoletis feeding attractant (consisting of ammonium carbonate and ammonium acetate, developed previously for Rhagoletis cerasi L.) to both fluorescent yellow or transparent sticky traps significantly increased catches of the fruit flies Rhagoletis batava Hering (pest of sea buckthorn) and Carpomyia schineri Loew. (pest of rose hips). Traps with lures were detecting the occurrence of both species 1–2 weeks before as compared to traps without lure, and quantitative aspects of the flight could be followed in more detail in traps with lure. Thus in detection and monitoring surveys, where sensitivity of the trap is highly important, the use of traps with synthetic lure added is strongly recommended.

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Acta Phytopathologica et Entomologica Hungarica
Authors: M. Tóth, J. Jósvai, K. Hári, B. Pénzes, Zs. Vuity, I. Holb, I. Szarukán, Zs. Kecskés, I. Dorgán-Zsuga, S. Koczor, and E. Voigt

For acceptable capture efficiency it was necessary to add acetic acid to pear ester for successful trapping of codling moth populations in Hungary. The activity of pear ester on its own was very weak and unsatisfactory. Pear ester+acetic acid baited traps caught on an average 25% (mean of 6 tests) of the catch in pheromone traps. Traps with pear ester+acetic acid were clearly advantageous as compared to pheromone traps in that they caught not only males but also females (both virgins and mated) in a high percentage. Traps baited with pear ester+acetic acid clearly outperformed high-load pheromone lures in orchards with mating disruption and should be the right choice for the grower for sampling populations of codling moth in a mating disruption situation. In orchards with no mating disruption the relative inefficiency of pear ester+acetic acid baited traps as compared to pheromone traps can easily be overcome by applying more traps than usual. Thus the overall codling moth numbers caught will become higher and would make any conclusions drawn more reliable. Traps baited with pear ester+acetic acid always caught more when set at the highest branches (3.0–3.5 m) than when set lower (1.5–1.8 m) on trees.

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