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  • Author or Editor: Elena Palade x
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The authors describe a case of unilateral adenocarcinoma emerging from the Harderian gland, filling the right orbital cavity of a Florida Red-bellied Turtle ( Pseudemys nelsoni ). The tumour did not produce any metastasis but presented an expansive growth and led to the dislocation and protrusion of the right eyeball. Histopathological analysis revealed the presence of numerous mitotic figures in the cellular population that made up the tumour. The tumour cells completely filled the alveoli of the gland and had a nest-like structure. The authors also emphasise the importance of the differential diagnosis of this rare pathological change in turtles. Epithelial hyperplasia of the Harderian gland’s duct, observed in animals suffering from vitamin A deficiency, can also lead to an enlargement of the eyelid, but in these cases the change usually involves both eyelids symmetrically. This is the first description of a Harderian gland adenocarcinoma in a Florida Red-bellied Turtle.

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Zoltán Demeter, Elena Palade, Éva Balogh, Csaba Jakab, Róbert Farkas, Balázs Tánczos and Sándor Hornok

Here we report a case of canine babesiosis with unusual morphology of the causative agent. A male, seven-week-old Labrador retriever puppy, exhibiting severe anaemia and haemoglobinuria, was presented at the Clinic of Internal Medicine in February 2011. The puppy was euthanised. The most relevant pathological changes were icterus, severe splenomegaly, generalised lymphadenopathy and haemoglobin nephrosis. Samples were collected from various organs for histology within one hour post mortem. Impression smears were also prepared from the spleen after overnight storage at 4 °C. Tissue sections and smears showed the presence of multiple, coccoid intraerythrocytic bodies that measured 1–2 μm and resembled small babesiae. No large piroplasms were seen. DNA was extracted from the spleen, and a conventional PCR was performed for the amplification of a 450-bp region of the 18S rRNA gene of piroplasms. The causative agent was identified as Babesia canis canis, with 99% sequence identity to other European isolates. Sequence identity to B. gibsoni was only 91%. This is the first account to verify that the morphology of the large canine piroplasm, B. canis, can be uniformly small babesia-like post mortem or following the storage of tissue samples.

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Elena Palade, Nóra Biró, Mihály Dobos-Kovács, Zoltán Demeter, Míra Mándoki and Miklós Rusvai

From a total of 1819 great tits ( Parus major ) ringed in 2007 in Pilis Mountains, Hungary, 15 birds presented nodular proliferative lesions on different areas of the head and eyelids, suggesting a poxvirus infection. Three birds were submitted for analysis. The presence of avipoxvirus infection was confirmed by histopathology, electron microscopy (EM) and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based technique. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a 428 base pairs (bp) fragment of the viral 4b core protein gene revealed 100% identity between two of the Hungarian isolates (PM9 HUN, PM33 HUN) and two great tit poxvirus strains isolated in Norway in 1973 (GTV A256, GTV A311). The third Hungarian isolate (PM34 HUN) was more closely related to a different Norwegian isolate (GTVA310) than to the Hungarian isolates. The nucleotide sequence analysis of a shorter fragment of the viral 4b core protein (227 bp) gene revealed 100% identity between the Hungarian isolates, the same Norwegian isolates and a great tit poxvirus strain detected in Austria in 2007.

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: János Gál, Krisztina Landauer, Elena Palade, Katalin Ivaskevics, Miklós Rusvai and Zoltán Demeter

The authors describe a squamous cell carcinoma arising from the ear canal of a Long-eared Hedgehog ( Hemiechinus auritus ). No metastasis could be identified elsewhere in the animal. Due to the irritation caused by the tumorous proliferation the animal constantly scratched the affected area, which led to secondary bacterial infection of the middle ear accompanied by the stagnation of an increased volume of local secretions. Using routine haematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical staining techniques, the tumour was identified as a squamous cell carcinoma. This work constitutes the first description of such a tumour in a Long-eared Hedgehog.

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