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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors:
Anna Szilasi
,
Lilla Dénes
,
Eszter Krikó
,
Caoimhe Murray
,
Míra Mándoki
, and
Gyula Balka

Abstract

Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) are retroviruses affecting felid species worldwide. A study was performed over a period of 5 months in Ireland with the aim to get an updated and more realistic prevalence of these retroviruses. A total of 183 EDTA-anticoagulated whole-blood samples were collected from cats distributed between 10 clinics. The samples were tested using both point-of-care enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Basic clinical data and vaccination history were also recorded for the sampled cats. The results of ELISA tests showed a prevalence of 10.4 and 3.3% for FIV and FeLV, respectively, and an apparent prevalence of 9.3% for FIV and 11.6% for FeLV with PCR. Phylogenetic analysis of the partial polymerase (pol) gene sequences obtained from 8 FIV-positive strains showed that all but one of the Irish strains belonged to FIV subtype A, and one to subtype B. The overall mean genetic similarity between the analysed strains was 91.15%.

Open access
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors:
Zoltán Szelényi
,
Orsolya Gabriella Balogh
,
Fernando Lopez-Gatius
,
Irina Garcia-Ispierto
,
Eszter Krikó
, and
György Gábor

Double ovulation occurs more frequently in multiparous cows with high milk production than in primiparous cows and the rate of twin pregnancy/calving is increasing worldwide. Diagnosis of twin pregnancy is possible by ultrasound at the time of early pregnancy examination [28–34 days after artificial insemination (AI)]. Pregnancy proteins are also well-known indicators of gestation. The risk of pregnancy loss during the first trimester of gestation for cows carrying twins is three to nine times higher than for cows carrying singletons. Pregnancy-specific protein B (PSPB) is a good indicator not only of pregnancy but also of pregnancy loss. The aims of this study were (a) to collect calving data in some Hungarian Holstein-Friesian herds (n = 7,300) to compare PSPB serum concentrations (measured 29–35 days post insemination) in twin- and singleton-calving cows (Trial 1), and (b) to check the predictive value of PSPB serum concentration for twin pregnancy and pregnancy loss in high-producing Spanish Holstein-Friesian cows (n = 98; Trial 2). Our results showed almost 7% twin calving rate. Although hormonal treatments are commonly believed to be major causes of twin pregnancies, our data do not support this hypothesis. The only exception is the single PGF injection, which significantly increased twin calving. No effect of milk production on the risk of twin pregnancy was found, and twin pregnancy increased with parity. The AI bull, the bull’s sire, the bull’s grandfather and the cow’s father also affected twin calving (P ≤ 0.02). We found much higher frequency of twin calving in cows diagnosed pregnant with higher than 3 ng/ml serum PSPB concentrations at 29–35 days after insemination. In Trial 2, non-significant but well-marked differences were found in PSPB serum concentration between singleton- and twin-pregnant cow samples (2.1 and 2.9 ng/ml) at different bleeding times. Probably the small size of the study population and the effects of milk production on PSPB values may explain this lack of significance.

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