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Scientometrics
Authors: Ricardo Arencibia-Jorge and Felix de Moya-Anegón

Abstract  

Cuban scientific output at macro level has not been frequently studied in the literature on scientometrics. The current paper explores the different metric approaches to the Cuban scientific activity carried out by national and international authors. Also, the article develops a scientometric study of the Cuban scientific production as included in Scopus during the period 1996–2007, using socio-economic indicators combined with bibliometric indicators supported by the SCImago Journal & Country Rank. Web of Science and Scopus are compared as information sources. Results confirm the possibility to use Scopus to obtain an objective picture of the Cuban science behaviour during the end of the 1990s and the beginning of the XXI century. The SCImago Journal & Country Rank, in this case, offers an important set of indicators. The combination of these indicators with those related to socio-economic aspects of activities in Science and Technology, allow the authors to show a perspective of the Cuban science system evolution during the period analyzed. The inclusion in Scopus of less-cited journals published in Spanish language and its impact on productivity and citation-based indicators is also discussed. Our investigation found an increasing growth of the Cuban scientific production during the whole period, which is in correspondence to the country efforts and expenditures in Research and Development activities.

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Scientometrics
Authors: Lola García-Santiago and Felix De Moya-Anegón

Abstract  

Clustering is applied to web co-outlink analysis to represent the heterogeneous nature of the World Wide Web in terms of the “triple helix” model (university-industry-government). An initial categorization is based on families of websites, which is then matched with Spanish institutions from diverse sectors represented on the Web, to uncover cognitive structures and related subgroups with common interests and confirm the junction of sectors of the “triple helix” model. We may conclude that the clustering method applied to web co-outlink analysis works when fully institutionalized organizations are studied, to make their interconnections manifest.

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Abstract

A bibliometric analysis of the 50 most frequently publishing Spanish universities shows large differences in the publication activity and citation impact among research disciplines within an institution. Gini Index is a useful measure of an institution's disciplinary specialization and can roughly categorize universities in terms of general versus specialized. A study of the Spanish academic system reveals that assessment of a university's research performance must take into account the disciplinary breadth of its publication activity and citation impact. It proposes the use of graphs showing not only a university's article production and citation impact, but also its disciplinary specialization. Such graphs constitute both a warning and a remedy against one-dimensional approaches to the assessment of institutional research performance.

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Scientometrics
Authors: Cristina Faba-Pérez, Vicente Guerrero-Bote and Félix De Moya-Anegón
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Scientometrics
Authors: Antonio J. Gómez-Núñez, Benjamín Vargas-Quesada, Félix de Moya-Anegón and Wolfgang Glänzel

Abstract

In order to re-categorize the SCImago Journal & Country Rank (SJR) journals based on Scopus, as well as improve the SJR subject classification scheme, an iterative process built upon reference analysis of citing journals was designed. The first step entailed construction of a matrix containing citing journals and cited categories obtained through the aggregation of cited journals. Assuming that the most representative categories in each journal would be represented by the highest citation values regarding categories, the matrix vectors were reduced using a threshold to discern and discard the weakest relations. The process was refined on the basis of different parameters of a heuristic nature, including (1) the development of several tests applying different thresholds, (2) the designation of a cutoff, (3) the number of iterations to execute, and (4) a manual review operation of a certain amount of multi-categorized journals. Despite certain shortcomings related with journal classification, the method showed a solid performance in grouping journals at a level higher than categories—that is, aggregating journals into subject areas. It also enabled us to redesign the SJR classification scheme, providing for a more cohesive one that covers a good proportion of re-categorized journals.

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Abstract

This study on research collaboration (RC) is an attempt to estimate the degree of internationalization of academic institutions and regions. Furthermore potential influences of RC on excellence initiatives of modern universities are investigated relying on source data obtained from SCImago Institutions Rankings. A positive correlation exists between the degree of collaboration and the normalized impact. However, in contrast to output the normalized impact increase progression is non-linear and fluctuating. Differences occur regarding output volume and normalized impact at geographical region level for the leading universities. Different patterns of the Brute force distribution for each collaboration type were also observed at region level as well as at subject area level. A continuously reduced percentage of the domestic (non-collaboration) academic output is a world trend, whereas a steady increase of “international + national” collaboration is observed globally, however, less distinctive in Asia than in the other regions. The impact of Latin American papers originating from domestic production as well as from national collaboration remains considerably below world average values.

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Scientometrics
Authors: Zaida Chinchilla-Rodríguez, Anuska Ferligoj, Sandra Miguel, Luka Kronegger and Félix de Moya-Anegón

Abstract

The paper introduces the use of blockmodeling in the micro-level study of the internal structure of co-authorship networks over time. Variations in scientific productivity and researcher or research group visibility were determined by observing authors’ role in the core-periphery structure and crossing this information with bibliometric data. Three techniques were applied to represent the structure of collaborative science: (1) the blockmodeling; (2) the Kamada-Kawai algorithm based on the similarities in co-authorships present in the documents analysed; (3) bibliometrics to determine output volume, impact and degree of collaboration from the bibliographic data drawn from publications. The goal was to determine the extent to which the use of these two complementary approaches, in conjunction with bibliometric data, provides greater insight into the structure and characteristics of a given field of scientific endeavour. The paper describes certain features of Pajek software and how it can be used to study research group composition, structure and dynamics. The approach combines bibliometric and social network analysis to explore scientific collaboration networks and monitor individual and group careers from new perspectives. Its application on a small-scale case study is intended as an example and can be used in other disciplines. It may be very useful for the appraisal of scientific developments.

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Abstract  

Though there are many and diverse opinions as to the order in which the authors appear in research papers, the most accepted is the one which gives more responsibility to the first and last author. In this work, a study is carried out of the order in which the authors appear in research papers, in which at least one author affiliated to the University of Extremadura (Spain) has collaborated in the 1990–2005 period. The objective is to determine the difference in the position of men and women, and the resulting responsibility and visibility of female authors as opposed to male authors. In the University of Extremadura these positions are principally occupied by men, since throughout the period studied, no more than 20% of the papers have women either in the first or last position, while the percentage obtained by men is around 50%, the remaining percentage being occupied by authors not belonging at present to the Uex. Nevertheless, the women of the University of Extremadura have both a higher percentage than expected and a positive evolution in the more relevant positions in recent years.

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Abstract  

This paper explores a methodology for delimitating scientific subfields by combining the use of (specialist) journal categories from Thomson Scientific’s Web of Science (WoS) and reference analysis. In a first step it selects all articles in journals included in a particular WoS journal category covering a subfield. These journals are labelled as a subfield’s specialist journals. In a second step, this set of papers is expanded with papers published in other, additional journals and citing a subfield’s specialist journals with a frequency exceeding a certain citation threshold. Data are presented for two medical subfields: Oncology and Cardiac & Cardiovascular System. A validation based on findings from earlier studies, from an analysis of MESH descriptors from MEDLINE, and on expert opinion provides evidence that the proposed methodology has a high precision, and that expansion substantially enhanced the recall, not merely in terms of the number of retrieved papers, but also in terms of the number of research topics covered. The paper also examines how a bibliometric ranking of countries and universities based on the citation impact of their papers published in a subfield’s specialist journals compares to that of a ranking based on the impact of their articles in additional journals. Rather weak correlations especially obtained at the level of universities underline the conclusion from earlier studies that an assessment of research groups or universities in a scientific subfield that takes into account solely papers published in a subfield’s specialist journals is unsatisfactory.

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Scientometrics
Authors: Vicente Guerrero-Bote, Felipe Zapico-Alonso, María Espinosa-Calvo, Rocío Gómez-Crisóstomo and Félix de Moya-Anegón

Abstract  

The capacity to attract citations from other disciplines — or knowledge export — has always been taken into account in evaluating the quality of scientific papers or journals. Some of the JCR’s (ISI’s Journal Citation Report) Subject Categories have a greater exporting character than others because they are less isolated. This influences the rank/JIF (ISI’s Journal Impact Factor) distribution of the category. While all the categories fit a negative power law fairly well, those with a greater External JIF give distributions with a more sharply defined peak and a longer tail — something like an iceberg. One also observes a major relationship between the rates of export and import of knowledge.

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