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  • Author or Editor: F. J. dos Santos x
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Abstract

The role of CD25+ regulatory T cells during the course of Trypanosoma cruzi infection has been previously analyzed, and the bulk of results have shown a limited role for this T cell subpopulation. In this study, we have used an IgM, nondepleting monoclonal antibody (mAb) aiming at blocking interleukin (IL)-2 activity on CD25+ T cells. The administration of this antibody 10 days before infection increased the resistance of outbred Swiss mice to the Colombian strain of T. cruzi. Anti-CD25-treated mice had lower parasitemia and augmented numbers of effector memory T cells. In addition, these animals showed higher numbers of splenic T cells secreting IFN-γ and TNF-α, both cytokines described to be involved in the resistance to T. cruzi infection. The same treatment also increased the numbers of splenic T cells that produced homeostatic and regulatory cytokines, such as IL-2 and IL-10, and CD4+CD25+ T cells. The administration of nondepleting anti-CD25 mAb at the beginning of the chronic phase, when parasites were cleared from the blood, halted the inflammatory process in the heart, without any signs of infection reactivation. These results indicate that nondepleting anti-CD25 monoclonal antibodies may be useful to treat chronic Chagas’ disease.

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: P. Melnikov, F. J. dos Santos, S. B. Santagnelli, M. A. C. Secco, W. R. Guimarăes, A. Delben, and J. R. Delben
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Community Ecology
Authors: R. de S. Rezende, A. O. Medeiros, J. A. dos Santos Dahora, A. M. Tonin, J. F. Gonçalves Junior, and Y. Moretto

Abstract

The invertebrate biodiversity of subtropical streams depends on the seasonal input of organic matter, as much as the leaf decomposition process on stream system. However, one of the challenges in determining the importance of invertebrates for leaf breakdown in subtropical streams is the low taxonomic resolution applied in most studies. To overcome this limitation, here we used litter bags with senescent leaves to evaluate the impact of different taxonomic resolutions of trophic group classification to assess the seasonal importance of invertebrate community for leaf litter breakdown in a subtropical stream (Atlantic Forest in western of Paraná state, Brazil). Litterfall was quarterly measured over a year. The leaf litter accumulated in an interval of 30 days was retrieved, weighed, and used for the leaf breakdown experiments (by litter bags). We found a lower importance of invertebrate community richness and density (shredders and scrapers) in leaf breakdown process irrespective of the taxonomic resolution (family or genus level used). Hyphomycetes biomass and fungi sporulation also did not present changes among sample times, and consecutively, importance for leaf breakdown. However, the richness and density of Chironomidae taxa respond differently depending on the taxonomic resolution used. Low litter breakdown may be explained by the increase of consumption of microorganisms, due to high density of Chironomidae scrapers evaluated at the genus level. Moreover, temperature is the main factor responsible for breakdown over the year, in a positive way. Therefore, our results indicated the family level as the taxonomic resolution sufficient to assess the role of shredders and scrapers in the leaf litter breakdown process of this subtropical stream system.

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