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  • Author or Editor: Gábor Cech x
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During a survey on the Myxobolus infection of two cyprinid fishes, the ide (Leuciscus idus) and the roach (Rutilus rutilus), myxosporean developmental stages were found around the arteries of the gill filaments and in the gill lamellae. An analysis of the 18S rDNA sequences of these stages revealed that plasmodia developing in the ide belonged to Myxobolus elegans, those developing in the gill lamellae of the roach corresponded to M. intimus, while plasmodia developing in close contact with the cartilaginous gill rays proved to be developmental stages of M. feisti. A strict seasonal cycle with a very long intrapiscine development was recorded for M. elegans and M. intimus. Developing plasmodia of the latter Myxobolus spp. occurred from early summer to next spring, and spore formation took place only in April. No seasonality associated with M. feisti infections was found. Developing plasmodia and mature spores of this species occurred simultaneously in different seasons of the year. Myxobolus feisti spore formation always occurred in close contact with the cartilaginous tissue of the gill filaments but spores were rarely encapsulated in the cartilaginous gill rays.

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Molnár et al. (2015) reported two types of echinostomatid metacercariae in the lateral line organ of Hungarian fish species. Type 1 metacercariae possessed 27 collar spines and 16 uniform and three larger dorsal spines, whereas Type 2 metacercariae bore 27 collar spines and 19 equal-sized dorsal spines. In the recent work, molecular studies carried out on the ITS region and partial 28S rDNA sequences of two types of echinostomatid metacercariae and the sequences of adult stages of the species of Petasiger Dietz, 1909 collected from cormorants (Phalacrocorax carbo L.) showed that some of the Type 2 metacercariae corresponded to Petasiger exaeretus Dietz, 1909, whereas other morphologically similar metacercariae were identified as Petasiger phalacrocoracis (Yamaguti, 1939). The sequences of the Type 1 metacercariae with three larger dorsal spines could not be identified with any of the known sequences from echinostomatid trematodes.

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Authors: Réka Borzák, Kálmán Molnár, Gábor Cech and Csaba Székely

Infection of the cornea in fishes by Myxobolus plasmodia is a common but still little known site preference of myxosporeans. A sporadic but striking infection in the cornea of the roach (Rutilus rutilus) was observed in Lake Balaton, Hungary. Relatively small, round plasmodia 250 to 500 μm in diameter developed in the dense connective tissue of the cornea. Morphological and molecular biological examination of spores collected from cysts in the cornea demonstrated that this infection is caused by Myxobolus fundamentalis, a species hitherto reported only from the cartilaginous gill arch of the roach. The 18S rDNA sequences of spores from the cornea showed 99.9% identity to the sequences of spores from the gill arch, and they also shared 99.9% identity with the sequences of triactinomyxon actinospores obtained from the oligochaete Isochaetides michaelseni.

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Authors: Gábor Cech, Diána Sándor, Kálmán Molnár, Petra Paulus, Melitta Papp, Bálint Preiszner, Zoltán Vitál, Ádám Varga and Csaba Székely

Abstract

Two species of the genus Posthodiplostomum (Digenea: Diplostomatidae) (Posthodiplostomum brevicaudatum Nordmann, 1832 and Posthodiplostomum cuticola Nordmann, 1832) are known as parasites of Hungarian native fishes. Metacercariae of P. cuticola are widespread in Europe and cause black spot disease. Several species of Posthodiplostomum were described also from North America but none of them has been isolated in Hungary up to now. Posthodiplostomum centrarchi Hoffman, 1958 has been detected recently in pumpkinseeds (Lepomis gibbosus L., 1758) in several European countries. Posthodiplostomum centrarchi was isolated for the first time in Hungary from pumpkinseeds caught in the Maconka water reservoir in 2015. Thereafter, several natural waters (e.g. the River Danube, Lake Balaton and the Sió channel) were sampled in order to determine its presence and distribution. Only the native species P. cuticola was detected in Lake Balaton on cyprinids but a relatively high infection rate of P. centrarchi was observed in the Sió channel close to the lake. Pathological changes were absent, and metacercariae were mostly attached to the surface of the liver, kidney and heart. The phylogenetic analysis of the ITS and COI sequences of P. centrarchi and P. cuticola clustered into two distinct branches, which was in agreement with the morphological results.

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Authors: Gábor Cech, Diána Sándor, Kálmán Molnár, Petra Paulus, Melitta Papp, Bálint Preiszner, Zoltán Vitál, Ádám Varga and Csaba Székely

Abstract

Two species of the genus Posthodiplostomum (Digenea: Diplostomatidae) (Posthodiplostomum brevicaudatum Nordmann, 1832 and Posthodiplostomum cuticola Nordmann, 1832) are known as parasites of Hungarian native fishes. Metacercariae of P. cuticola are widespread in Europe and cause black spot disease. Several species of Posthodiplostomum were described also from North America but none of them has been isolated in Hungary up to now. Posthodiplostomum centrarchi Hoffman, 1958 has been detected recently in pumpkinseeds (Lepomis gibbosus L., 1758) in several European countries. Posthodiplostomum centrarchi was isolated for the first time in Hungary from pumpkinseeds caught in the Maconka water reservoir in 2015. Thereafter, several natural waters (e.g. the River Danube, Lake Balaton and the Sió channel) were sampled in order to determine its presence and distribution. Only the native species P. cuticola was detected in Lake Balaton on cyprinids but a relatively high infection rate of P. centrarchi was observed in the Sió channel close to the lake. Pathological changes were absent, and metacercariae were mostly attached to the surface of the liver, kidney and heart. The phylogenetic analysis of the ITS and COI sequences of P. centrarchi and P. cuticola clustered into two distinct branches, which was in agreement with the morphological results.

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