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Klaus-Dieter Budras, Patrick H. McCarthy, Wolfgang Fricke, Renate Richter: Anatomy of the Dog. An Illustrated Text. 4th edition with Aaron Horowitz and Rolf Berg. Schlütersche GmbH & Co. KG Verlag und Druckerei, Hannover, Germany. 222 pages, 71 large-sized colour plates including several illustrations, radiographs, drawings and photographs. 9¾ × 13½", hardcover. ISBN 3-87706-619-4. Price: Ł54 / € 86. Kees J. Dik: Atlas of Diagnostic Radiology of the Horse - Diseases of the Front and Hind Limbs. Second extended and revised edition, Schlütersche, Hannover, 2002. 300 pages with 702 radiographs, 82 drawings. 9¾ ×13½", hardcover. ISBN 3-87706-651-8. Price:€ 144 / USD 179.5 / £ 89.

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An 11-year-old, Hungarian half-bred stallion was presented with a history of mixed left hindlimb lameness of 6 months duration. Subchondral bone cyst of the medial femoral condyle and injury of the medial meniscus were diagnosed. Osteochondral autograft transplantation (mosaic arthroplasty) was performed, taking grafts from the less weight-bearing medial border of the medial femoral trochlea of the affected limb, and transplanting them into the cyst during arthroscopy. The lameness was evaluated prior to and one year after the operation with a motion analysis system during treadmill exercise. Considerable improvement of the lameness and the clinical signs as well as successful transplantation of the grafts, and a new hard joint cartilage surface of the medial femoral condyle could be detected during follow-up arthroscopy. Osteochondral autograft transplantation seems to bee a possible alternative for treating subchondral cystic lesions of the medial femoral condyle in horses. A new technique for the surgical treatment of a subchondral cystic lesion of the medial femoral condyle in the horse is described.

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Six pieces of grafts, 6.5 mm in diameter, 20 mm in length, were taken from each of 170 cadaver hindlimbs, using the cranial surface of the medial femoral trochlea for harvesting. The age of the horses varied between 4 months and 23 years. 30 limbs under the age of 12 years were selected for transplantation. Three of six grafts were transplanted into the medial femoral condyle using different combinations of tunnel depth and dilation. With ageing, a significant decline in transplantability was detected. In general, mosaicplasty cannot be recommended in horses above 11 years. Based on a previous clinical case (Bodo et al., 2000), a good surface alignment was indeed achieved with a combination of graft length drilling and dilation in most cases. However, the occasional entrapment of cartilage debris under the graft prevented perfect alignment in the present cadaver study in 27% of the grafts transplanted in this manner. Since the protrusion of grafts never exceeded 1.5 mm, we conclude that drilling 3–5 mm deeper than graft length with graft length deep dilation can avoid disadvantageous protrusion of the transplanted hyaline cartilage caps, achieving bone decompression at the same time.

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