Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: G. Kele x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

In this study Halloumi cheese samples were produced from 1:1 mixtures of ewe's and cow's milk. Cheese samples were divided into two groups. Samples of the first group were dry salted and then vacuum packed. Next group samples were ripened in tin packs containing brine solution of 13% salt content. The changes in chemical, microbiological and sensory properties of the samples were investigated during the ripening period. It was found that the samples of the first group had higher dry matter and fat contents and acidity values but lower salt and ash contents than the samples of second group. It was also observed that salt and ash contents and acidity values increased in both groups during the ripening period while pH values decreased. In microbiological view, coliforms, total viable, yeast and mould counts were higher in the first group than in the second one. Coliforms decreased in both groups during the ripening period. On the other hand, total viable, yeast and mould counts decreased in second group. According to sensory evaluations, the first group samples were more preferred. The yield of cheese was determined as 15.40%.

Restricted access

In this study, Halloumi cheese samples were produced from preacidified cow's milk. Glucono-delta-lactone (gdl), lactic, citric and acetic acids were used in preacidification treatments. The cheese samples were vacuum packed and ripened at 7±1 °C for 90 days. The changes in some chemical, microbiological and sensory properties of the Halloumi cheese samples were investigated during the ripening period. Gdl and lactic acid were found more suitable than citric and acetic acids as an acidulant in Halloumi cheese production

Restricted access

The current Hungarian Soil Classification System (HSCS) was elaborated during the 1960s, based on the genetic principles of Dokuchaev. It was developed before sufficient data and modern data processing tools were available and served different purposes than current users need or apply it for.The central unit is the soil type, grouping soils that were believed to have developed under similar soil-forming factors and processes. The major soil type is the highest category that groups soils based on climatic, geographical and genetic bases. Subtypes and varieties are distinguished according to the assumed dominance of soil-forming processes and observable/measurable morphogenetic properties. STEFANOVITS (1963) defined the 23 soil-forming processes that have a dominant impact on the differentiation of the 39 soil types of the system.Based on accumulated data and experience, as well as on numerical tools for defining taxonomic relationships a modernization process was carried out. The process included: linking processes to diagnostics, review and numerical study of similarities and dissimilarities of existing units, development of new central units, development of a computer assisted key, and definition of methodology to derive the lower level units. The new, 15 soil types are defined by stronger morphogenetic and measurable criteria, but with the application of legacy data and the developed key, the earlier units can be converted to the new ones, hence the value of legacy data can be preserved.

Restricted access

According to the Hungarian Soil Information and Monitoring System's (HSIMS) database a group estimation method was developed to predict the mean soil hydrophysical properties. The estimation efficiency of the worked out prediction procedures was controlled on a test database, and on a dataset of a study area. It can be established that the water retention and the hydraulic conductivity of soils are sufficiently predictable from the category data of soil maps. The 10-digit map codes of the PWW mapping method were created by different estimation methods, and as a result the PWW map was drawn. However, it is not always possible to estimate the necessary soil hydrophysical properties from the available map information for preparing the PWW map. Sometimes the knowledge gained from the field reports is needed as well. Further studies are planned for integrating these morphological information into our estimations.

Restricted access