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  • Author or Editor: G. Liao x
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Abstract  

In this paper, several small-scale screening test methods were discussed on evaluating the thermal hazard of reactive substances. Generally the sensitivities of DSC and ARC are not high enough to evaluate the thermal hazards for all reactive substance, especially, for those of complex reactions containing a phase and/or chemical reaction mechanism change in the lower temperature range. Using the C80, however, the reaction can easily be detected in the lower temperature range due to its high sensitivity. Therefore, the C80 gives generally more accurate results than DSC and ARC. Data from C80 and Dewar vessel were compared and it indicates that the Dewar vessel has also high enough sensitivity to evaluate the thermal hazard and determine the heat flux in lower temperature range of reactive substances.

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Abstract  

New special engineering thermoplastics, poly(phthalazinone ether sulfone) (PPES) and poly(phthalazinone ether sulfone ketone) (PPESK), containing phthalazinone are synthesized through step-polymerization. The kinetics of thermal degradation of PPES and PPESK (1/1) in nitrogen is investigated at several heating rates by thermogravimetry (TG). It is concluded that, based on using Satava’s theory, the thermal degradation mechanism of PPESK (1/1) is nucleation and growth, the order of reaction of the degradation process is one (n = 1). In contrast, the thermal degradation mechanism of PPES is a phase boundary controlled reaction and the order of the reaction is two (n = 2). The kinetic parameters, including reaction energy and frequency factor of thermal degradation reaction for PPES and PPESK (1/1) are analyzed using isoconversional Friedman, Kissinger–Akahira–Sunose (K–A–S) and Ozawa method. In addition, the study focus on the influence of heating rate and ratio of ketone/sulfone on thermal stability and the life estimation are described.

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