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  • Author or Editor: George Kampis x
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Abstract

As a novel tool for evaluating research competences of R&D actors, science overlay maps have recently been introduced in the scientometric literature, with associated measures for assessing the degree of diversification in research profiles. In this study, we continue the elaboration of this approach: based on science overlay maps (called here m-maps), a new type of map is introduced to reveal the competence structure of R&D institutions (i-maps). It is argued, that while m-maps represent the multidisciplinarity of research profiles, i-maps convey the extent of interdisciplinarity realized in them. Upon i-maps, a set of new measures are also proposed to quantify this feature. With these measures in hand, and also as a follow-up to our previous work, we apply these measures to a sample of Hungarian Research Institutions (HROs). Based on the obtained rankings, a principal component analysis is conducted to reveal main structural dimensions of researh portfolios (of HROs) covered by these measures. The position of HROs along these dimensions then allows us to draw a typology of organizations, according to various combinations of inter- and multidisciplinarity characteristic of their performance.

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The relation between science and religion has always been a question of interest since the early 19th century. Following international tendencies, in the past ten years a related polemic about evolution has become increasingly intensive in Hungary. The starting point of our research was the assumption that differences exist in the views of those with a factual knowledge of evolution (e.g. students who learned about evolution and studied aspects of it in laboratory, etc.), and those, whose attitudes towards evolution were formed exclusively by a general world view they devote themselves to. Subjects were university students. Questions we asked were the following: To what extent and in what way are students religious? Are biology students less or more religious then the average university student? Can religion encourage (or discourage) scientific thinking? Do insights of religion and of science complement or contradict each other? Do religion and science refer to the same kind of reality? What contributes more to a student's thinking about evolution: is it (lack or) existence of religious background or is it university education? Do students of biology attempt to reconcile evolution and creation? We discuss the background and present and analyse the - sometimes surprising - results.

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Abstract

Measuring the intellectual diversity encoded in publication records as a proxy to the degree of interdisciplinarity has recently received considerable attention in the science mapping community. The present paper draws upon the use of the Stirling index as a diversity measure applied to a network model (customized science map) of research profiles, proposed by several authors. A modified version of the index is used and compared with the previous versions on a sample data set in order to rank top Hungarian research organizations (HROs) according to their research performance diversity. Results, unexpected in several respects, show that the modified index is a candidate for measuring the degree of polarization of a research profile. The study also points towards a possible typology of publication portfolios that instantiate different types of diversity.

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