Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Geun-Il Park x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract  

Performance tests of silver ion-exchanged zeolite (AgX) adsorbent for the control of radioiodine gas generated from a high-temperature process were carried out using both non-radioactive and a radioactive methyl iodide tracers. From the identification of SEM-EDAX analysis, an experimental result of silver ion-exchanged ratio containing 10-30 wt% of Ag was fit to that calculated by the weight increment, and it was confirmed that the silver was uniformly distributed inside the pores of the adsorbent. Demonstration test of AgX-10 adsorbent using radioactive methyl iodide tracer was performed. The removal efficiency of radioiodine with AgX-10 in the temperature ranges of 150 to 300 °C was in the ranges of 99.9% to 99.99%, except for 300 °C. The influence of the long-term weathering and the poisoning with NO2 gas (200 ppm) on adsorption capacity of AgX-10 was also analyzed. The removal efficiency of radioactive methyl iodide by AgX-10 weathered for 14 weeks was 99.95%. Long-term poisoning test showed that the adsorption efficiency of methyl iodide started to decrease after 10 weeks, and the removal efficiency of radioiodine by AgX-10, poisoned for 16 weeks, was 99% (DF=100).

Restricted access

Abstract  

This work studied a way to reclaim uranium from contaminated UO2 oxide scraps as a sinterable UO2 powder for UO2 fuel pellet fabrication, which included a dissolution of the uranium oxide scraps in a carbonate solution with hydrogen peroxide and a UO4 precipitation step. Dissolution characteristics of reduced and oxidized uranium oxides were evaluated in a carbonate solution with hydrogen peroxide, and the UO4 precipitation were confirmed by acidification of uranyl peroxo–carbonate complex solution. An agglomerated UO4 powder obtained by the dissolution and precipitation of uranium in the carbonate solution could not be pulverized into fine UO2 powder by the OREOX process, because of submicron-sized individual UO4 particles forming the agglomerated UO4 precipitate. The UO2 powder prepared from the UO4 precipitate could meet the UO2 powder specifications for UO2 fuel pellet fabrication by a series of steps such as dehydration of UO4 precipitate, reduction, and milling. The sinterability of the reclaimed UO2 powder for fuel pellet fabrication was improved by adding virgin UO2 powder in the reclaimed UO2 powder. A process to reclaim the contaminated uranium scraps as UO2 fuel powder using a carbonate solution was finally suggested.

Restricted access