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  • Author or Editor: Guillaume Enguehard x
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Authors: Guillaume Enguehard and Xiaoliang Luo

Abstract

This paper is a modest contribution to the understanding of vocalic strength. Our aim is to show that the strength of consonants and the strength of vowels can be unified. For this, we propose that the only factor of strength is length. More precisely: branching segments are stronger and segments sharing their positions with other segments are weaker. We discuss several examples of phenomena related to vowels which illustrate this strength hierarchy.

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In this paper, I aim to unify the Empty Category Principle of Government Phonology with another (more general) principle: the Obligatory Contour Principle. I show that these principles share numerous structural properties: (i) they prevent sequences of identical entities, and (ii) they trigger the same repair mechanisms. The main difference is substantial: ECP handles empty syllabic components, when OCP handles phonological features. I propose to broaden the definition of OCP in including all phonological entities and I show to what extent this definition can account for the effects of ECP. Finally, I point out that this analysis can also account for some specificities of word-edges.

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Authors: Xiaoliang Luo and Guillaume Enguehard

Abstract

In this paper, we propose that the contexts of fortition and lenition can be represented with a very simple autosegmental tool: branching. We point out a major shortcoming of Coda Mirror Theory: though this model tries to account for strength with lateral relations, length should also be factored in order to account for the inalterability of geminates. In order to unify the principles that regulate strength, we propose a consistent theory built exclusively on length, without lateral relations.

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Authors: Quentin Dabouis, Guillaume Enguehard, Jean-Michel Fournier and Nicola Lampitelli

Abstract

This paper deals with English vowel reduction and focuses on what is generally referred to as the Arab Rule (Ross 1972 i.a.). Vowels tend to reduce if the preceding syllable is light, whereas they do not reduce if the preceding syllable is heavy. Our purpose is twofold: first, based on the scrutiny of Wells (2008), we evaluate the efficiency of the Arab Rule and show that is empirically verified. Second, we propose an analysis of blocking contexts couched within CVCV phonology (Lowenstamm 1996). We use two central notions such as Government and Licensing, and show that vowel reduction only applies to “governing-and-governable” vowels.

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