Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for

  • Author or Editor: Gy. Kasza x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

While in developed countries research findings are available on the estimation of the realistic number of different diseases and their economic impact at social level, in Central and Eastern European countries these country specific data are neither sufficient nor reliable. This study partially fills the gap and gives a picture of the real number of foodborne salmonellosis in Hungary. In the spring of 2017, a survey about diarrhoeal and foodborne diseases was conducted by interviewing 1001 adults (over the age of 18). Our survey showed that approximately 18 times more individuals are suffering from Salmonella infection than it is assumed under the national and international epidemiological database. Based on our estimation, the annual number of foodborne salmonellosis may range from 91 242 to 105 606 in Hungary. In this paper a methodology has been developed to estimate the true occurrence of this disease. Our results can be used to calculate the costs-benefit ratios of future salmonellosis prevention programmes and inform decision-makers on the effectiveness of Salmonella-related measures in the area of food safety.

Open access

Between November 2016 and April 2017, 240 H5N8 outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza have been registered in Hungary resulting in the culling of 3.45 million poultry. Aiming at the prevention of the reoccurrence of the public scare experienced in regard of the H5N1 outbreak in 2006, in 2016 a more proactive and responsive communication activity has been implemented, which resulted in a total of 1661 media appearances. For consistent and credible information, all press inquiries were answered by the Chief Veterinary Officer of Hungary, and journalists received the requested information usually within 8 hours. In order to understand how effective communication methods help to stop decrease of poultry meat consumption, determinative factors according to consumer risk perception and changes in poultry meat consumption were identified. Analysis of the consumer survey conducted in 2016 showed that education and gender were the most important socio-demographic variables, though poultry consumption was almost completely undisturbed. The results of the 2016 consumer survey were compared to a corresponding dataset published on the 2006 avian influenza public scare, which showed 12.6% increase in the number of those respondents, who have not changed their consumption behaviour due to avian influenza.

Restricted access

In recent years, there have been many changes in the food market, which have greatly transformed our approach to food chain supervision. The increasing complexity of the food chain (e.g. globalization of food trade, expansion of raw materials and additives, technical advancement), the frequent changes in food consumption trends and the phenomenon of food crime belong to the most challenging issues for food chain control institutions. These factors require the re-evaluation of the role of consumers in the food chain. The overall aim of this research was to explore consumers’ risk perception and risk avoidance for a more efficient, targeted risk communication. In the survey 1003, face-to-face interviews were made using questionnaire. The statistical analysis of data was followed by the identification and characterization of 4 relevant target groups with cluster analysis method: disinterested youngsters (17.0%), conscious elders (39.4%), food adepts (27.5%), and soul of the family (16.1%). Results indicated, that the Hungarian society can be segmented regarding to food associated risk perception and avoidance. It has been also proven, that risk perception is influenced by demographic factors. Furthermore, we have also managed to conclude that efficient risk communication would require a well-aimed and focused communication strategy.

Restricted access

Consumption of dietary supplements (DS) has been showing a persistent, rapidly growing tendency all over the world. A new branch has been created on the borderline of food and pharmaceutical industries. It is a general tendency that the policy and regulation towards the products of this branch are lagging far behind the practice. This is an especially important problem with adolescents. To work out an efficient regulatory framework, we have to have an adequate picture on consumer behaviour and attitudes towards these products. Based on literature analysis of two focus group interviews, we have developed a motivational model on usage of DS, which has been tasted during a direct-question survey involving more than 500 respondents. Our results have proven that the consumption of DS is proliferated among young recreational athletes. One quarter of them consumes proteins, one tenth L-carnitine at least 2–3 times a week. The most important motivational factor is the improvement of sport performance. The level of confidence in these products is considerably influenced by peers and trainers. The propensity to underestimate the potentially adverse consequences of these products is high.

Restricted access

Modification of dairy products’ fat composition or replacement by other fats are common practices in the industry. Products in which milkfat is partially or wholly substituted by vegetable fats are defined as dairy analogues. This study delivers gap-filling information about sour cream analogues in nutritional aspects, focusing on the fat-related attributes. Analogue sour creams contained 29.6% less saturated fatty acids, 88.4% less cholesterol and 88.7% more mono- and poly-unsaturated fatty acids than the sour creams. Trans fatty acids were present in both products, which could not be linked to artificial hydrogenation in either case. Digestibility of the examined samples might be different, as sour creams had more short and medium chain fatty acids than the analogues. Overall, sour cream analogues, besides serving as an alternative to sour cream, have particular advantages based on their nutritional values.

Open access
Acta Alimentaria
Authors: Á. Vajda, Cs. Mohácsi-Farkas, L. Ózsvári, and Gy. Kasza

Salmonellosis is a widely known infectious disease in Hungary that played dominant role between 1960 and 1996 and remained one of the top food-borne illnesses to these days with an estimated total number of 96 048 cases (2019). Beside direct costs of treatment, indirect costs are also significant on the level of population. Among indirect costs, consumer well-being losses are difficult to be estimated. For this purpose, the willingness to pay (WTP) method is used most frequently that measures the cost an individual would undertake to avoid a certain harm. For the well-being loss estimation, the data of National Food Chain Safety Authority's annual consumer survey was used, in which 323 respondents gave evaluable answer to the open-ended WTP question. Results indicate that an average respondent would pay 18.6 EUR to avoid salmonellosis. Main factors affecting WTP were size of family and number of children. The numbers indicate that the consumer well-being loss could be about 1 786 060 EUR annually, resulting from the multiplication of the estimated number of annual salmonellosis cases and the average WTP value. It can be concluded that consumer well-being losses alone would call for further interventions in Salmonella eradication, not to mention other – more direct – cost elements.

Open access

Abstract

The aim of this research was to assess the consumer habits of lactose sensitive persons in case of lactose-free products and their other shopping aspects for development of new, dairy-based lactose-free products. The research was based on face-to-face questionnaire survey, and those who declared to be lactose sensitive were analysed. Among them, only half of the women (49.3%) and one third of the men (34.6%) were medically proven lactose sensitive, so more than half of the respondents declared themselves affected on the basis of self-diagnosis. Our results show that reliably regular customers of lactose-free products are women and persons with medical diagnosis, high educational degree, and under the age of 30. The lactose-free consumer group prefers the following product features: lactose-free label; rich in calcium, vitamins, and fibre, and free of carbohydrate, sugar, and gluten. Only two-thirds of lactose sensitive customers (66.7%) consume lactose-free products regularly, so it can be assumed that the level of knowledge of this disease, its treatment, and the importance of lactose-free dairy products among these persons is insufficient. This could be solved with education, advertisement, and other information opportunities.

Open access