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  • Author or Editor: H. Abdel Rahman x
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Abstract  

The kinetics of extraction of U(IV) by TBP in kerosene was investigated using a stirred Lewis cell. The effect of the different parameters affecting the extraction rate as well as temperature were separately investigated. The rate equation deduced from the experimental results show that the extraction of U(IV) is first order dependent on TBP concentration while it is of zero order with respect to U(IV), H+, NO 3 and HNO3 concentrations. The data obtained show that the extraction process is governed by chemical reactions taking place at teh interface.

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Abstract  

The extraction of U(IV) by bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) monothiophosphinic acid (CYANEX 302) in kerosene from nitric acid solution has been investigated under equilibrium conditions. The effects of the different parameters affecting the extraction process were studied and the stoichiometry of the extracted species was elucidated. The kinetics of this extraction was also investigated using a stirred Lewis cell. The effects of the different parameters affecting the extraction rate as well as the temperature were separately investigated. The results are interpreted by a reaction mechanism where the extraction process of U(IV) is controlled by a chemical reaction at the interface rather than in the bulk phase.

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Abstract  

The distribution of UO 2 2+ , Ce3+ and Am3+ between Chelex-100 and 0.2 and 5.0M ammonium thiocyanate solutions of different hydrogen ion concentrations has been investigated. The results obtained are compared with parallel experimental results using the anion exchanger Dowex-1×4 and the cation excharger Dowex-50×8. It is found that Chelex-100 can act as anion exchanger at pH<2 and as cation and chelate exchanger at higher pH. A main feature of the distribution results of UO 2 2+ , Am3+ and Ce3+ with Chelex-100 is the very high distribution coefficient for the three cations at pH higher than 3.5 from aqueous solutions containing 0.2 or 5.0M ammonium thiocyanate.

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The deterrent and toxicity effects of Melissa officinalis L. essential oil on Tetranychus urticae Koch were studied under laboratory conditions. Leaf discs treated with increasing concentrations of lemon balm oil showed high percentage of repellency (64–86%), respectively. The oviposition deterrent indices (ODI) of Melissa oil was ranged (74–94%) for T. urticae at concentration (0.3–1%). The direct contact application of M. officinalis oil proved to be the most toxic application on various stages of T. urticae compared to leaf dipping, fumigation and systemic applications. Oil formulation (Melissacide) was shown to be the effective one against T. urticae nymphs, females and eggs (LC50 = 0.03, 0.03 and 0.04%) compared to Melissa oil.The toxicity of M. officinalis oil and Melissacide by direct spray to females and eggs of the predatory mite Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor) was tested. The predator N. californicus is extremely less sensitive to Melissa oil and Melissacide than the pest T. urticae in the laboratory. When N. californicus was sprayed with (LC50 and LC90 values reported on T. urticae), females mortalities ranged between 8.5–13%, respectively. Melissacide is non-persistent in the environment due to its volatile nature. No phytotoxicity was observed in bean plant after four weeks of Melissacide treatment.Results obtained chemically from M. officinalis oil, may suggest that the higher percentage of benzene, 1(1,5dimethyl-4hexenyl)4methyl (= α-curcumene), caryophyllene oxide, ëCadinol and cedrene of the oil could be responsible for the toxic effect.

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