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Summary

High-performance capillary electrophoresis with amperometric detection (CE-AD) has been used for analysis of eight bioactive components of the leaves, stems, and roots of Valeriana wallichii DC, after a relatively simple extraction procedure with ethanol. Under the optimum conditions, the eight components can be well separated or (apigenin and luteolin) separated nearly to baseline within 23 min by use of 50 mM borax (pH 9.2) as running buffer and a separation potential of 16 kV. Linearity was excellent over two orders of magnitude of concentration and detection limits (S/N = 3) ranged from 1.7 × 10−7 to 1.8 × 10−8 g mL−1. This method was used for comparison of the concentrations of the bioactive compounds in different parts of the plant on the basis of their electropherograms or ‘characteristic electrochemical profiles’. Assay results were satisfactory.

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Abstract  

The two complexes of [Ln(CA)3bipy]2 (Ln = Tb and Dy; CA = cinnamate; bipy = 2,2′-bipyridine) were prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectra, ultraviolet spectra, thermogravimetry and differential thermogravimetry techniques. The thermal decomposition behaviors of the two complexes under a static air atmosphere can be discussed by thermogravimetry and differential thermogravimetry and infrared spectra techniques. The non-isothermal kinetics was investigated by using a double equal-double steps method, the nonlinear integral isoconversional method and the Starink method. The mechanism functions of the first decomposition step of the two complexes were determined. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH , ΔG and ΔS ) and kinetic parameters (activation energy E and the pre-exponential factor A) of the two complexes were also calculated.

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Abstract  

The complex of [Nd(BA)3bipy]2 (BA = benzoic acid; bipy = 2,2′-bipyridine) has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra, single crystal X-ray diffraction, and TG/DTG techniques. The crystal is monoclinic with space group P2(1)/n. The two–eight coordinated Nd3+ ions are linked together by four bridged BA ligands and each Nd3+ ion is further bonded to one chelated bidentate BA ligand and one 2,2′-bipyridine molecule. The thermal decomposition process of the title complex was discussed by TG/DTG and IR techniques. The non-isothermal kinetics was investigated by using double equal-double step method. The kinetic equation for the first stage can be expressed as dα/dt = A exp(−E/RT)(1 − α). The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH , ΔG , and ΔS ) and kinetic parameters (activation energy E and pre-exponential factor A) were also calculated.

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Abstract  

Photoinitiating behaviors of oligo(α-aminoketones) (OAK) macrophotoinitiator containing aminoalkylphenone group on free-radical photopolymerization had been investigated by differential photo-calorimetry (DPC). The macrophotoinitiator showed comparative performance with those commercial photoinitiators with lower molecular mass. The effect of photoinitiator concentrations and UV intensity on the polymerization rate was investigated, and the value of exponential factor was found to be 0.5 at the beginning of polymerization, suggesting that the photopolymerization initiated by OAK followed biradical termination mechanism. Photosensitizer isopropyl thioxanthone (ITX) and oxygen severely restricted the polymerization in these systems. Photoinitiators with lower molecular mass showed higher reactivity than those with higher molecular mass.

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The common wheat line, YW243, developed in our research group, was tested for the resistances of barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV), powdery mildew (Pm) and stripe rust in field, and was analyzed by molecular markers for convenient trace of the resistant genes in breeding. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) analysis and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) assay further demonstrated that YW243 was a homozygous multiple translocation line of Triticum aestivum, Thinopyrum intermedium and Secale cereale (T7DS·7DL-7XL & 1BL·1RS). The disease resistance test and marker analysis showed that YW243 carried seven resistance genes to the three diseases, including Bdv2 to BYDV on 7DL-7XL, Pm4 to powdery mildew on 2AL, Yr2, Yr9, Sr 31 and Lr26 and a new Yr to stripe rust on 7B, 1BL, 1RS and 2BL. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers Xpsr687 and Xwg380 , sequence tagged site (STS) marker STS 1700 , simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers Xgwmc364 and Xgwm582 , SSR markers Xgwm388 and Xgwm501 can be used as diagnostic tools to track Bdv2, Pm4, Yr2, Yr9 and Yr in YW243 , respectively; and two amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers M54E63 - 700 and M54E64 - 699 can also be used to select Yr in YW243 .

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Abstract  

A ternary binuclear complex of dysprosium chloride hexahydrate with m-nitrobenzoic acid and 1,10-phenanthroline, [Dy(m-NBA)3phen]2·4H2O (m-NBA: m-nitrobenzoate; phen: 1,10-phenanthroline) was synthesized. The dissolution enthalpies of [2phen·H2O(s)], [6m-HNBA(s)], [2DyCl3·6H2O(s)], and [Dy(m-NBA)3phen]2·4H2O(s) in the calorimetric solvent (VDMSO:VMeOH = 3:2) were determined by the solution–reaction isoperibol calorimeter at 298.15 K to be
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\Updelta_{\text{s}} H_{\text{m}}^{\theta }$$ \end{document}
[2phen·H2O(s), 298.15 K] = 21.7367 ± 0.3150 kJ·mol−1,
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\Updelta_{\text{s}} H_{\text{m}}^{\theta }$$ \end{document}
[6m-HNBA(s), 298.15 K] = 15.3635 ± 0.2235 kJ·mol−1,
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\Updelta_{\text{s}} H_{\text{m}}^{\theta }$$ \end{document}
[2DyCl3·6H2O(s), 298.15 K] = −203.5331 ± 0.2200 kJ·mol−1, and
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\Updelta_{\text{s}} H_{\text{m}}^{\theta }$$ \end{document}
[[Dy(m-NBA)3phen]2·4H2O(s), 298.15 K] = 53.5965 ± 0.2367 kJ·mol−1, respectively. The enthalpy change of the reaction was determined to be
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\Updelta_{\text{r}} H_{\text{m}}^{\theta } = 3 6 9. 4 9 \pm 0. 5 6 \;{\text{kJ}}\cdot {\text{mol}}^{ - 1} .$$ \end{document}
According to the above results and the relevant data in the literature, through Hess’ law, the standard molar enthalpy of formation of [Dy(m-NBA)3phen]2·4H2O(s) was estimated to be
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\Updelta_{\text{f}} H_{\text{m}}^{\theta }$$ \end{document}
[[Dy(m-NBA)3phen]2·4H2O(s), 298.15 K] = −5525 ± 6 kJ·mol−1.
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Abstract

In this study, the ability of microRNA-1906 (miR-1906) to attenuate bone loss in osteoporosis was evaluated by measuring the effects of a miR-1906 mimic and inhibitor on the cellular toxicity and cell viability of MC3T3‐E1 cells. Bone marrow-derived macrophage (BMM) cells were isolated from female mice, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase signalling was performed in miR-1906 mimic-treated, receptor-activated nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclasts. In-vivo, osteoporosis was induced by ovariectomy (OVX). Rats were treated with 500 nmol/kg of the miR-1906 mimic via intrathecal administration for 10 consecutive days following surgery. The effect of the miR-1906 mimic on bone mineral density (BMD) in OVX rats was observed in the whole body, lumbar vertebrae and femur. Levels of biochemical parameters and cytokines in the serum of miR-1906 mimic-treated OVX rats were analysed. The mRNA expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88), p-38 and NF-κB in tibias of osteoporotic rats (induced by ovariectomy) was observed using quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Treatment with the miR-1906 mimic reduced cellular toxicity and enhanced the cell viability of MC3T3‐E1 cells. Furthermore, osteoclastogenesis in miR-1906 mimic-treated, RANKL-induced osteoclast cells was reduced, whereas the BMD in the miR-1906 mimic-treated group was higher than in the OVX group of rats. Treatment with the miR-1906 mimic also increased levels of biochemical parameters and cytokines in the serum of ovariectomised rats. Finally, mRNA expression levels of TLR4, MyD88, p-38 and NF-κB were lower in the tibias of miR-1906 mimic-treated rats than in those of OVX rats. In conclusion, the miR-1906 mimic reduces bone loss in rats with ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis by regulating the TLR4/MyD88/NF‐κB pathway.

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Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been recently found to be a gaseous signaling molecule in plants. In this work, we studied the role of H2S in alleviating salinity stress during wheat grain germination (Triticum aestivum L. Yangmai 158). Pretreatment with NaHS, a H2S donor, during wheat grain imbibition, could significantly attenuate the inhibitory effect of salinity stress on wheat germination. NaHS-pretreated grain showed higher amylase and esterase activities than water control. NaHS pretreatment differentially stimulated the activities of catalase (CAT), guaiacol peroxidase (POD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX), decreased the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced NaCl-induced changes in plasma membrane integrity in the radicle tips of seedlings compared with water control. We conclude that H2S plays an important role in protecting wheat grain from oxidative damage induced by salinity stress.

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Abstract  

The recombination of hydrogen and oxygen in technical gaseous waste of nuclear power plants has been studied. A highly efficient catalyst for reacting H2 with O2 to form water was prepared. Various operating conditions and factors affecting the recombination of H2 and O2 were tested and the best conditions were determined. Results show that the Pd–Al2O3 catalyst prepared had very good characteristics. The recombination rate of H2 and O2 was higher than 98.3% and 99.9%, respectively. After recombination, residual concentrations of H2 and O2 in waste gas were O2<3 ppm, H2<400 ppm. The Pd–Al2O3 catalyst and operating conditions determined for gaseous waste processing of nuclear power plants were satisfactory.

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Red coleoptile is an easily observed trait in Triticum aestivum and can provide some protection against stress. Here, TaMYB-A1 or TuMYB-A1, homologous to TaMYB-D1, which controls red coleoptile formation in the common wheat cultivar ‘Gy115’, was isolated from eight T. aestivum and 34 T. urartu cultivars. The genome sequence of TaMYB-A1 was 867 bp with an intron of 93 bp, which was similar to the MYBs regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis in T. aestivum but different from other MYB transcription factors regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis. TaMYB-A1 had an integrated DNA-binding domain of 102 amino acids and a transcriptional domain of 42 amino acids, which was responsible for regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis. TaMYB-A1 was assigned to the same branch as the MYBs regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis in a phylogenetic tree. A transient expression analysis showed that TaMYB-A1 induced ‘Opata’ coleoptile cells to synthesize anthocyanin with the help of ZmR. A non-functional allele of TaMYB-a1 existed in common wheat cultivars containing rc-a1. One single nucleotide was deleted 715 bp after the start codon in TaMYB-a1 compared with TaMYB-A1. The deletion caused a frame shift mutation, destroyed the DNA transcription activator domain, and resulted in TaMYB-a1 losing its ability to regulate anthocyanin biosynthesis in ‘Opata’ coleoptile cells. Those cultivars with functional TaMYB-A1 or TuMYB-A1 have red coleoptiles. The isolation of TaMYB-A1 should aid in understanding the molecular mechanisms of coleoptile traits in T. aestivum.

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