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  • Author or Editor: Habib Borjian x
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Koroshi is the Balochi dialect spoken by the Korosh (Koroš), a group associated with the Qashqa’i tribes of Fārs in southwestern Iran. Entirely isolated from the main body of the Baloch habitat, Koroshi distinguishes itself in grammar and lexicon among Balochi varieties. The phonology of Koroshi demonstrates a solid Balochi pedigree but not without major mutations. Likewise, the nominal case-number system of Koroshi shows significant deviation from most other Balochi dialects. In verb morphosyntax a salient peculiarity is the coexistence of two parallel systems of the imperfective, which appear to be stabilising in an evolutionary process of the Koroshi aspect system. Borrowing from the neighbouring languages is salient in the lexical domain, where Persian, the Fārs dialects, and Qashqa’i Turkish each play a part as the source language. Given all these peculiarities the degree of mutual intelligibility between Koroshi and other Balochi dialects is yet to be established.

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The article studies and glosses a Ṭabari-Persian versified vocabulary ( neṣāb ) composed in 1848 by Amir Timur Qajar. The subject language, Ṭabari, also called Māzandarāni, is spoken in the Caspian province of Māzandarān in northern Iran and has been subjected to an enormous Persian influence in modern times. The Neṣāb provides a unique opportunity to study the linguistic developments of Ṭabari, more particularly so because the three oldest manuscripts of the Neṣāb are written in different dialects of the language. An attempt is made here to identify these dialects and their diachronic developments through a comparative phonological analysis.

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Persian surrounds much of the Tabari (or Māzandarāni) speaking area, that is, the province of Māzandarān south of the Caspian Sea. The transition zones between the two languages lay in the valleys and foothills of the Alborz range, which separates Māzandarān from the Iranian Plateau. Within this zone we find a range of hybrid dialects that are divided into two distinct groups: Persian dialects influenced by Tabari and vise versa. This study aims at the latter group, which we call Tabaroid, i.e., Tabari varieties carrying various amounts of Persian mix. The linguistic data come from some twenty villages in the south-central Alborz, separated from Tehran by a mountain ridge. The main objective here is to establish the dialectal and areal position of the Tabaroid varieties by closely examining their diachrony, phonology, and above all morphosyntax.

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