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Abstract

Translational language has been reported to have unique characteristics, or translation universals, as compared to native non-translational production. One of the most widely studied features is simplification, i.e., translated texts tend to be less complex than non-translational texts. This study tested this hypothesis by comparing the translated and creative writing texts produced by a single author, Robert van Gulik, on the same topic (Judge Dee's detective adventures). Our well-controlled comparisons showed that the translated text was lexically less diverse, but syntactically more complex and generally less readable. The cognitive load of translation and the source text constrained the amount of vocabulary used in the translation compared with free writings. On the other hand, longer and more complex sentences reflected the translator's efforts to state the information in a more explicit form when conveying the ancient Chinese detective stories to the Western world. Our research, thus, offers some insights into the investigation of the simplification hypothesis and the relation between translation and writing.

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Abstract  

We studied the removal process of excessive free carbon in the nano-SiC powder by TG-DTA-MS, XRD and TEM three methods. The studies showed that the temperature of removing excessive free carbon in the nano-SiC powder should be about 750°C in air.

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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors:
Hai-Qing Zhang
,
Bang-Fa Ni
,
Wei-Zhi Tian
,
Gui-Ying Zhang
,
Dong-Hui Huang
,
Cun-Xiong Liu
,
Cai-Jin Xiao
,
Hong-Chao Sun
, and
Chang-Jun Zhao

Abstract  

Twenty different brands of Chinese tea were analyzed for multiple trace elements, including some essential and toxic elements, by neutron activation analysis (NAA). A comparison among tea brands from China, India, US and other countries was made for the ranges and averages of concentrations for Na, K, Mn, Cu, and Br. It has been observed that the trace element contents in tea leaves are largely dependent upon the soil and the environment where the tea grows. Chinese tea is rich in Mn and Cu comparing with those of other counties surveyed, but is indigent in Na. The transference ratio for each element determined (i.e., the fraction of an element in tea leave transferred into solution when tea is leached by percolation) is also reported. Adult daily intakes of some essential and toxic elements from tea drinking were also estimated.

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