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  • Author or Editor: I. Biró x
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In the present study, changes in the infectivity and effectiveness of four Glomus mosseae strains of different origin were investigated in calcareous loamy chernozem soils treated with Cd at three levels (0, 50, 100 mg Cd kg −1 ) in a pot experiment. Frequency of infection (F%), arbuscular richness (a%) and shoot dry matter, macro-(N, P, K, S, Ca, Mg) and microelements (Zn, Cu, Ni, Mn, Mo, Co) and the Cd content of the host plants were compared to determine whether there was any variability in infectivity and effectiveness between G. mosseae strains of different origin. Functional diversity was found in the infectivity and effectiveness of the studied G. mosseae strains. In Cd-treated soil, AMF inoculation was beneficial to the plant growth, P uptake and shoot Cd content of the host. However, the higher uptake of other macro- and microelements was noted for non-mycorrhizal plants compared to mycorrhizal plants. The lower shoot content of some elements did not cause nutrient deficiency in mycorrhizal plants. The present results support the hypothesis that in polluted soils, the development of mycorrhizal symbiosis has the potential for AMF to protect their hosts against Cd toxicity rather than to improve nutrient uptake.

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The formulae suggested for a series of complexes of Pd(II) with various amino acids have been verified by thermal methods using a derivatograph. A correlation of the obtained kinetic parameters with the structures suggested by electronic and IR spectra of the substances has been attempted.

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A method for determining the variation of the kinetic parametersA, E andn is proposed, and is exemplified by a study of PVC degradation, with the chlorine partially substituted by benzene. Because of the complexity of the method, a digital computer has been used.

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A key driver of biodiversity loss is human landscape transformation. Change detection and trajectory analysis are frequently applied methods for studying landscape change. We studied to what degree habitat-specific change detection and trajectory analysis provide different information on landscape change compared to the analysis with land-cover statistics. Our research was carried out at two spatial scales (regional, 1800 km2, 360 random points; local, 23 km2, polygon-based maps) in the Kiskunság, Hungary. Spatio-temporal databases were prepared using historical maps, aerial photos and satellite images from 1783, 1883, 1954, and 2009. Local expert knowledge of landscape history and recent vegetation was used during the historical reconstructions. We found large differences at both scales between land-cover based and habitat-specific analyses. Habitat-specific change detection revealed that grassland loss was not continuous in the different habitats, as land-cover based analysis implied. Ploughing affected open sand grasslands and sand steppes differently in the periods studied. It was only apparent from the habitat-specific analyses that from the grasslands only mesotrophic and Molinia meadows were relatively constant, up until the 1950s. The gradual increase in forest area revealed by land-cover CHD analyses was split into natural and anthropogenic processes by habitat-specific analyses. Habitat specific trajectory analysis also revealed ecologically important historical differences between habitats. Afforestation affected especially the open sand grasslands, whereas wetland habitats were relatively stable. The most important trajectory was the one in which closed sand steppes were ploughed during the 19th century, and remained arable fields until present. Fifty percent of the regional trajectories of 18th century open sand grasslands terminated in tree plantations at present, though 82% of the current open sand grasslands of the local site can be regarded as ancient. We concluded that dividing land-cover categories into finer habitat categories offered an opportunity for a more precise historical analysis of key habitats, and could reveal important ecological processes that cannot be reconstructed with land-cover based analyses. It also highlighted habitat-specific processes making natural and social drivers better interpretable. Information on the diversity of habitat-histories may serve as a basis for spatially more explicit conservation management.

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Abstract  

By using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) it has been shown that some pristine carbon SWNT's and MWNT's of different makes, contain a multitude of trace element impurities at various concentration levels including also amounts which can be considered as nanoelectronically dopant quantities. The same holds for the above mentioned carbon nanotubes also after their inadequately so-called purification.

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Nutrition and lifestyle-related diseases are some of the leading morbidities among the Hungarian population. People who want to lose weight often complain that healthy diet is expensive.

Our aim was to quantify the costs of three different types of diet for a three-day period. We compared “traditional Hungarian”, low energy, and diabetic diets, considering both energy content and expenses related to lifestyle.

According to our estimation: diabetic (including medication) and ”traditional” Hungarian diets were the most expensive. Low energy diet proved to be the most cost-effective despite the extra expenditures of higher physical activity.

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A pot experiment was designed to study the variability of some inside and outside mycorrhizosphere characteristics of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and the potential transfer of Cd, Ni and Pb in a metal-contaminated calcareous chernozem soil. Substrates of the pots were taken from a long-term field experiment site at Nagyhörcsök, Hungary, where the cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni) and lead (Pb) were spiked as single salt application at four levels (0, 30, 90 and 270 mg kg−1 dry soil) 12 years prior to this study. Beside the biomass production and element content of plants, the total catabolic enzyme activity measured by fluorescein diacetate analysis (FDA) and the colonization parameters of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF); the infection intensity (M%) and the arbusculum richness (A%) were determined. After 12 years, the indigenous mycorrhiza fungi in the soils might be adapted to the contaminated environments, as a function of metals and their applied doses. Stress-defense strategies of the fungal-plant symbiosis, such as the better functioning of the AMF by enhanced arbusculum richness or by the improved phosphore-mobilization capacity was found mainly at the middle (90 mg kg−1) doses of metals. Increasing quantity of Cd above the maximum permitted concentration in the soil could enhance the biomass production of barley roots and reduce the Cd translocation towards the shoots. Outside rhizosphere parameters as the FDA enzymatic activity were stronger influenced by the long-term metal stress, than the inside mycorrhiza colonization, showing the protecting effect of the symbiosis both for the macro- and microsymbionts. Mycorrhizosphere conditions are part of the common plant-microbe strategies and plant-defending mechanisms that can result in a better stress-alleviation at chronic metal-exposures.

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Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are obligatory biotrophic symbionts living in the roots of most terrestrial plants. AM fungi (AMF) have a positive effect on plant growth and plant nutrition, especially under stress conditions.  The aim of the present study was to observe the relationship between the mycorrhizal dependency and nutrient uptake of host plants and the rate of AMF colonization in a pot experiment. The degree of host growth responses to AMF colonization is expressed as mycorrhizal dependency (MD).  The pot trial was set up with a sterilized calcareous chernozem soil from Nagyhörcsök (Hungary) in a growth chamber under controlled climatic conditions. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) plants were inoculated with Glomus claroideum (BEG23) , Glomus fasciculatum (BEG53), Glomus geosporum (BEG11), Glomus mosseae (BEG12) strains and a Glomus mosseae AMF culture produced by authors. The dry biomass production, the micro- and macronutrient concentrations of the shoots and the parameters of the mycorrhizal infection were determined. Each AM fungi species or isolate caused different and distinct changes in host plant growth and nutrient uptake. The biomass production of tomato increased significantly in the presence of AM symbiosis. The mean values of MD, calculated from shoot dry matter, varied between 36% and 55%. Mycorrhizal inoculation improved the P, N and K uptake of tomato. The highest values for root colonization, frequency of infection or arbuscular richness were found in the root of tomato inoculated with the two Glomus mosseae strains. The highest MD and nutrient contents appeared in the shoot of tomato treated withour Glomus mosseae strain, which may indicate a stronger affinity (compatibility) between the symbiotic partners. The results confirmed that the selected AMF strains are applicable in sustainable horticulture.

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Phytoremediation is an approach designed to extract excessive heavy metals from contaminated soils through plant uptake. Cadmium (Cd) is among the elements most toxic to living organisms. Health hazards associated with the lethal intake of Cd include renal (kidney) damage, anaemia, hypertension and liver damage. A greenhouse experiment was carried out with Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) grown on artificially spiked soil (100 μg Cd g−1) with EDTA (2 mmol kg−1 in 5 split doses), FYM, vermicompost (VC) and microbial inoculants (MI) such as Azotobacter sp. and Pseudomonas sp. The growth of Brassica juncea L. was better in soil amended with FYM or VC as compared to unamended Cd-polluted soil. Growth was slightly suppressed in EDTA-treated soil, whereas it was better after treatment with MI. The application of FYM and VC increased the dry matter yield of Indian mustard either alone or in combination with microbial inoculants, while that of EDTA caused a significant decrease in the biomass of Indian mustard. The application of microbial inoculants increased the dry matter yield of both the roots and shoots, but not significantly, because MI shows greater sensitivity towards cadmium. The maximum cadmium concentration was observed in the EDTA +MI treatment, but Cd uptake was maximum in the VC + MI treatment. The Cd concentration in the shoots increased by 120% in CdEDTA over the Cd100 treatment, followed by CdVC (65%) and CdFYM (42%) in the absence of microbial inoculants. The corresponding values in the presence of MI were 107, 51 and 37%, respectively. A similar trend was also observed in the roots in the order CdEDTA+M > CdVC+M > CdFYM+M>Cd100+M.MI caused an increase in Cd content of 5.5% in the roots and 4.1% in the shoots in the CdEDTA+M treatment compared with the CdEDTA treatment. FYM, VC and EDTA also increased Cd uptake significantly both in the shoots and roots with and without microbial inoculants.The results indicated that Vermicompost in combination with microbial inoculants is the best treatment for the phytoremediation of Cd-contaminated soil by Indian mustard, as revealed by the Cd uptake values in the shoots: CdVC+M (2265.7 μg/pot) followed by CdEDTA+M (2251.2 μg/pot), CdFYM+M (1485.7 μg/pot) and Cd100+M (993.1 μg/pot).

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