Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: I. Cseh x
Clear All Modify Search
Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Authors: N. Eszes, A. Bohács, Á. Cseh, G. Toldi, A. Bikov, I. Ivancsó, V. Müller, I. Horváth, J. Rigó, B. Vásárhelyi, Gy Losonczy and Lilla Tamási

Asthmatic inflammation during pregnancy poses a risk for maternal and fetal morbidities. Circulating T cell immune phenotype is known to correlate with airway inflammation (detectable by fractional concentration of nitric oxide present in exhaled breath (FENO)) in non-pregnant allergic asthmatics. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship of peripheral T cell phenotype to FENO and clinical variables of asthma during pregnancy.We examined 22 pregnant women with allergic asthma in the 2nd/3rd trimester. The prevalence of Th1, Th2, regulatory T (Treg) and natural killer (NK) cell subsets was identified with flow cytometry using cell-specific markers. FENO, Asthma Control Test (ACT) total score and lung function were evaluated.Peripheral blood Th1, Th2, Treg, and NK cell prevalence were not significantly correlated to airway inflammation assessed by FENO in asthmatic pregnant women (all cells p > 0.05; study power > 75%). However, an inverse correlation was detected between Th2 cell prevalence and ACT total scores (p = 0.03) in asthmatic pregnancy.Blunted relationship between T cell profile and airway inflammation may be the result of pregnancy induced immune tolerance in asthmatic pregnancy. On the other hand, increased Th2 response impairs disease control that supports direct relationship between symptoms and cellular mechanisms of asthma during pregnancy.

Restricted access
Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Authors: S. Younes, Márta Csire, Bernadett Pályi, G. Mikala, I. Vályi-Nagy, I. Cseh, Márta Benczik, Cs. Jeney, T. Takács, Éva Simon, V. Fülöp, G. Berencsi, Gy. Fekete and Mária Visy

Pregnant women were examined following healthy pregnancies at term. Amniotic fluids were sampled before arteficial rupture of membranes using closed vacutainer system. Blood samples were also taken from the pregnants simultaneously.Endotoxin concentrations of amniotic fluids were tested by the semiquantitative Limulus amebocyte lysate. Both amniotic fluids and blood samples were tested for the presence of DNA of lymphotropic human herpesviruses. The DNA of human papillomaviruses were tested only in the amniotic fluid samples.One-third of the amniotic fluids tested were found to contain measurable amounts of endotoxin. Lymphotropic herpesvirus DNA was deteced in every fourth amniotic fluid sample and in every 8 th blood sample. The prevalence of papillomaviruses was 7 of 96 samples.No significant correlation was found between the presence of endotoxin and viruses in the amniotic fluids. Epstein-Barr virus, human cytomegalovirus and human herpesvirus type 7 were found more frequently in the amniotic fluids than in blood samples (7 to 1). The prevalence of human herpesvirus 6 and 8 was higher in the blood samples than that in the amniotic fluids.The mean weight of the neonates were not impaired significantly by the presence of either viruses or endotoxin. Possible post partum consequences, i.e. partial immunotolerance to viruses is discussed.

Restricted access