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Companies are facing a rapidly changing and ever more challenging environment. Globalization, together with a shifting political landscape, is combining with major transformations in population, urbanization, resource utilization, climate change and consumer attitudes. Through the evolution of communications networks there is growing connectivity that with the rise of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) results in an increasingly transparent society. Socially responsible investors combining forces with the media and NGOs have emerged as a major force compelling firms through the capital markets toward a more environment friendly behaviour. The global food industry is especially susceptible to climate change and shifting consumer attitudes and thus has to increasingly respond to external stakeholders in order to remain competitive. How did attitudes and perceptions change in recent years toward the industries environmental performance and how did this influence their financial results? Our research investigates forty-six global food industry companies.

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The development of high performance insulating materials incorporating nanotechnologies has enabled considerable decrease in the effective thermal conductivity. Besides the use of conventional insulating materials, such as mineral fibers, the adoption of new nano-technological materials such as aerogel, vacuum insulation panels, graphite expanded polystyrene, is growing. In order to reduce the thermal conductivity of polystyrene insulation materials, during the manufacturing, nano/micro-sized graphite particles are added to the melt of the polystyrene grains. The mixing of graphite flakes into the polystyrene mould further reduces the lambda value, since graphite parts significantly reflect the radiant part of the thermal energy. In this study, laboratory tests carried out on graphite insulation materials are presented. Firstly, thermal conductivity results are described, and then sorption kinetic curves at high moisture content levels are shown. The moisture up-taking behaviour of the materials was investigated with a climatic chamber where the relative humidity was 90% at 293 K temperature. Finally, calorific values of the samples are presented after combusting in a bomb calorimeter.

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Nanopages
Authors: I. Tamáska, Z. Vértesy, A. Deák, P. Petrik, K. Kertész, and László Biró

Bioinspired 1+2D nanoarchitectures inspired by the quasi-ordered structures occurring in photonic nano-architectures of biological origin, like for example butterfly scales, were produced by depositing a layer of SiO2 nanospheres (156 nm and 292 nm in diameter) on Si wafers, over which a regular multilayer composed from three alternating layers of SiO2 and TiO2 was deposited by physical vapor deposition. Flat multilayers were deposited in the same run on oxidized Si (324 nm SiO2 thickness) for comparison. Different types of disorder (in plane and out of plane) were purposefully allowed in the 1+2D nanoarchitectures. The positions of the specular reflection maxima for the flat multilayer and for the two different bioinspired nanoarchitectures were found to be similar. Additionally to this, the bioinspired nanoarchitectures exhibited angle independent diffuse reflection too, which was absent in the flat multilayer. Different model calculations were made to explain the specular and diffuse optical properties of the samples. Satisfactory agreement was obtained between experimental data and model calculations.

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: Zs. Albert, Zs. Erős-Honti, G. Solymossy, L. Kuznyák, A. Miskó, Cs. Deák, M. Ladányi, I. Terbe, and I. Papp

In this study two widely consumed Hungarian bell pepper cultivars ‘Hó’ and ‘Kárpia’, were examined. Aims of the investigations were to describe the postharvest behaviour of the cultivars and assign associated traits to the largely different shelf-life that is well known for these cultivars. ‘Hó’ is a white fruit flesh cultivar with average postharvest storability, while ‘Kárpia’ is of Capia type, with extended shelf-life. Postharvest water loss rates were measured, and differences between the cultivars were found. Interestingly, however, the longer shelf-life ‘Kárpia’ fruits showed higher water loss rate. Bright field microscopy was used to study the tissue structure of the outer pericarp of pepper fruits to find explanation for the good storability of ‘Kárpia’. Significantly more cell layers of the hypodermal collenchyma were found in ‘Kárpia’, than in ‘Hó’. Thicker cell walls were also found in this tissue but also in the epidermis. Fluorescent imaging confirmed these observations and also supported differences in the cuticular thickness between the cultivars. Our results highlight epidermal and hypodermal tissue structures as potential factors to influence the shelf-life of bell pepper fruits.

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Interventional Medicine and Applied Science
Authors: A. Doros, B. Nemes, Z. Máthé, A. Németh, E. Hartmann, Á. P. Deák, Zs. F. Lénárd, D. Görög, I. Fehérvári, Zs. Gerlei, J. Fazakas, Sz. Tóth, and L. Kóbori

Abstract

Introduction

Hepatic artery complication represents recognized sequel of liver transplantation that carries significant morbidity and mortality. Besides retransplantation, hepatic artery recanalization is provided surgically, or by percutaneous angioplasty and stent placement. This study provides an analysis of a single center experience comparing surgical and interventional treatments in cases of early hepatic artery complications.

Methods

In this retrospective single center study, 25 of 365 liver transplant recipients were enrolled who developed early hepatic artery complication after transplantation. Percutaneous intervention was performed in 10 cases, while surgical therapy in 15 cases. Mean follow-up time was not different between the groups (505±377 vs. 706±940 days, respectively).

Results

6 patients in the Intervention Group and 10 patients in the Surgery Group are alive. The retransplantation rate (1 and 3) was lower after interventional procedures, while the development of biliary complications was higher. The mortality rate was higher after operative treatment (2 and 5).

Conclusion

Interventional therapy is a feasible and safe technique for treatment of early hepatic artery complication after transplantation. Being less invasive it is an invaluable alternative treatment having results comparable to surgical methods.

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Interventional Medicine and Applied Science
Authors: E. Hartmann, A. Németh, Gy. Juharosi, Zs. Lénárd, P. Á. Deák, V. Kozma, P. Nagy, Zs. Gerlei, I. Fehérvári, B. Nemes, D. Görög, J. Fazakas, L. Kóbori, and A. Doros

Abstract

Hepatocellular carcinoma, which has developed in liver cirrhosis is a disease where liver transplantation can provide a cure both for the tumour and the underlying liver damage. However, patients can only be transplanted when the tumour number and size do not exceed the Milan criteria. Tumour ablation methods — such as radiofrequency ablation — can provide a chance to make the patient eligible for transplantation. Among the 416 Hungarian liver transplanted patients there are 6 who had received different types of ablative therapy as bridging therapy in different institutions. On the basis of analysis of the patients' data we created a guideline for the treatment of cirrhotic patients with hepatocellular carcinoma with the aim of developing a uniform Hungarian approach.

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Acta Botanica Hungarica
Authors: P. Török, E. Tóth, K. Tóth, O. Valkó, B. Deák, B. Kelbert, P. Bálint, Sz. Radócz, A. Kelemen, J. Sonkoly, T. Miglécz, G. Matus, A. Takács, V. A. Molnár, K. Süveges, L. Papp, L. Papp Jr., Z. Tóth, B. Baktay, G. Málnási Csizmadia, I. Oláh, E. Peti, J. Schellenberger, O. Szalkovszki, R. Kiss, and B. TÓthmérész

For understanding local and regional seed dispersal and plant establishment processes and for considering the ecotypes and other forms of specific variability, hard data of locally or regionally measured traits are necessary. We provided newly measured seed weight data of 193 taxa, out of which 24 taxa had not been represented in the SID, LEDA or BiolFlor databases. Our new measurements and formerly published data of locally collected seed weight records together covers over 70% of the Pannonian flora. However, there is still a considerable lack in seed weight data of taxonomically problematic genera, even though they are represented in the Pannonian flora with a relatively high number of species and/or subspecies (e.g. Sorbus, Rosa, Rubus, Crataegus and Hieracium). Our regional database contains very sporadic data on aquatic plants (including also numerous invasive species reported from Hungary and neighbouring countries) and some rare weeds distributed in the southwestern part of the country. These facts indicate the necessity of further seed collection and measurements.

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Acta Botanica Hungarica
Authors: Cs. Molnár, Zs. Molnár, Z. Barina, N. Bauer, M. Biró, L. Bodonczi, A. Csathó, J. Csiky, J. Deák, G. Fekete, K. Harmos, A. Horváth, I. Isépy, M. Juhász, J. Kállayné Szerényi, G. Király, G. Magos, A. Máté, A. Mesterházy, A. Molnár, J. Nagy, M. Óvári, D. Purger, D. Schmidt, G. Sramkó, V. Szénási, F. Szmorad, Gy. Szollát, T. Tóth, T. Vidra, and V. Virók

The first version of the map of the Hungarian vegetation-based landscape regions were prepared at the scale of 1: 200,000 (1 km or higher resolution). The primary goal of the map was to provide an exact background for the presentation and evaluation of the data of the MÉTA database. Secondly, we intended to give an up-to-date and detailed vegetation-based division of Hungary with a comprehensive nomenclature of the regions. Regions were primarily defined on the basis of their present zonal vegetation, or their dominant extrazonal or edaphic vegetation. Where this was not possible, abiotic factors that influence the potential vegetation, the flora were taken into consideration, thus, political and economical factors were ignored. All region borders were defined by local expert botanists, mainly based on their field knowledge. The map differs in many features from the currently used, country-wide, flora-or geography-based divisions in many features. We consider our map to be temporary (i.e. a work map), and we plan to refine and improve it after 5 years of testing.

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