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Summary  

Minerals in the soil range from those that easily weather to those that are very resistant to the weathering processes. The minerals used in this study are referred to as “resistates” because of their resistance to natural weathering processes.1 It is also known that there are some resistate minerals that have a tendency to contain uranium and thorium within their crystal structure. These resistates can contain as much as 15-20% of the total uranium and thorium present in the soil.9 Do resistates dissolve in acids, particularly in the HF/HNO3 procedures, if not what can be done to the HF/HNO3 process to dissolve more of the resistate minerals? How would these acid techniques compare to the fusion method used for mineral dissolution? Could the resistate minerals contain considerable amount of uranium and thorium? These were the questions addressed in this research. The comparative data indicate that the use of H2SO4 in the dissolution process resulted in ~25% overall increase in the minerals dissolving therefore resulting in a higher yield of extracted uranium and thorium.

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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors:
K. Inn
,
E. Hall
,
J. Woodward
,
B. Stewart
,
R. Pollanen
,
L. Selvig
,
S. Turner
,
I. Outola
,
S. Nour
,
H. Kurosaki
,
J. LaRosa
,
M. Schultz
,
Z. Lin
,
Z. Yu
, and
C. McMahon

Abstract  

Recoil ions from alpha-particle emission can contaminate surface-barrier detection systems. This contamination results in increased measurement uncertainty, and may require the replacement of expensive detectors. Disposable thin Collodion films are easily prepared and effectively retard the recoil ions when either directly applied to the surface of alpha-sources or as catcher foils between the source and the detector. The thin films are particularly effective for relatively low-level sources, but can sustain structural damage when exposed to high levels of recoil ions (tens of thousands per second) over extended periods of time.

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