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  • Author or Editor: Ildikó Regéczi x
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Many post-modern texts are inspired by the sub-genre of the picaresque novel. To refer to Gérard Genette’s category, it renews and reinvigorates tradition through imitation and indirect transformation. In texts dating from the second half of the 20th century, the picaresque novel mainly serves as a formal framework of playing with literariness. As post-modern space evokes the notion of emptiness or unfinished state (Mikhail Epstein), so does the journey itself become a shrivelling conceptual framework externally (when the emphasis is placed on natural, physical environment revealed in the wake of the journey) as well as internally (when the traveller turns inwards). It is exactly through reporting on the “ruined-state status” and taking an extensive journey in linguistic space that this framework can be “filled up.” Placing the emphasis on the text-oriented nature of Venichka’s character, this study will view her mainly from the perspective of the allegorical journey of Dostoevsky’s Prince Myshkin.

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We often come across thematic and formal equivalences in small narrative works of Chekhov and Kosztolányi on women's fate. Connecting situations and actions especially characterizes these works, as well as the presentation of equivalent episodes on the basis of a similar pattern of selection. The first part of the thesis mentions novellas by Chekhov and Kosztolányi in which examples of the fore-mentioned method of editing are present and where the starting and ending points of the work emphasize this practice. A similar way of thinking can be found in the background of those novellas of Chekhov and Kosztolányi, in which equivalence appears not as an analogy, but as an opposition. The second part of the thesis discusses two novellas, one by Chekhov, the other by Kosztolányi, of remarkable content and poetic similarity. Chekhov's ??????? (1899) and Kosztolányi's Erzsébet (1929) are both stories that can be modelled as lines of equivalency based on the same paradigm: the wholeness of the heroine, the unity of her individuality can only be realized through another person and the efforts made towards that goal are almost comical, yet their presentation is not altogether ironic in any of the cases-the author's perspective moves rather towards understanding and immersing. Both Chekhov and Kosztolányi set a seemingly unambiguous human deficiency to be multi-dimensional through the situational similarity and contrast in the equivalent episodes.

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The creative reception of Anton Chekhov in contemporary Hungarian literature often takes the form of a role-play in which poets put on an authorial mask that displays Russian literary references, while their Chekhovian intertexts constitute an organic part of a playful evocation of classic Russian literature. The form of the mask lyric, including especially that of the so-called “oroszvers” (verbatim: a Russian poem), is also characteristic of poetry from across the border in Transylvania; more specifically, of the writers’ generations starting out in the sixties and seventies, named after the book series entitled Forrás (Springs), growing up on the heritage of the 20th-century Hungarian poet Attila József, and apparently representing this heritage but, at the same time, introducing a new form of expression as well. This study focuses on the poetics of two such contemporary authors, László Király (b. 1943) and András Ferenc Kovács (b. 1959), in whose poetry I wish to examine the phenomenon belonging to the category of literary mystification, while analyzing the manifestations of the typical Chekhovian protagonist and the Chekhovian “atmosphere” as transposed into poetry.

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