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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Márta Lőrincz, Imre Biksi, Simon Andersson, Attila Cságola, and Tamás Tuboly

Transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) is a coronavirus-induced disease of pigs, characterised by diarrhoea and vomiting. The incidence of the disease had been decreasing since the late 1980s when deletion mutant variants (porcine respiratory coronavirus, PRCoV) of the virus emerged, repressing TGE gradually. Although disease manifestations are infrequent, the virus is still present in pig herds, causing sporadic outbreaks in a milder form. Identification and characterisation of the spike genes from TGEV and PRCoV, detected in such outbreaks, were performed in Hungary. Analysis of the amplified partial gene sequences showed that TGEV was present in herds with TGE clinical signs together with PRCoV. The sequences, apart from the deletions in PRCoV, were identical and at least two types of PRCoV spike proteins could be identified based on the length of the deleted sequence.

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Tibor Magyar, Barbara Ujvári, Levente Szeredi, Norbert Virsinger, Ervin Albert, Zoltán Német, Edit Csuka, and Imre Biksi

This paper reports an outbreak of haemorrhagic septicaemia caused by Pasteurella multocida B:2 in beef calves, a disease that has not been described in the Hungarian literature since 1943, and has not been reported to the World Organisation For Animal Health (OIE) since 1970. Acute haemorrhagic septicaemia was confirmed in beef calves on one small farm, and was suspected on two further nearby holdings with concomitant unexplained losses. The source of the infection could not be determined. Apart from a short duration of depression and loss of appetite, the affected calves developed characteristic distal limb oedema. Gross findings in two calves submitted for laboratory examinations included subcutaneous oedema and haemorrhages on serous membranes, and in one case severe pharyngeal lymph node enlargement was observed. Histological examinations revealed lesions characteristic of septicaemia. Moderate to large amounts of Pasteurella antigens were detected in all organs tested by immunohistochemistry. Two isolates of P. multocida (Pm240, Pm241) were cultured from these cases and examined in detail. These were identified as P. multocida ssp. multocida biovar 3. Both were toxA negative and belonged to serotype B:2. Multilocus sequence typing was used to assign these to a new sequence type (ST64) that is closely related to other haemorrhagic septicaemia causing strains of P. multocida regardless of the host.

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Anna Valkó, Imre Biksi, Attila Cságola, Tamás Tuboly, Krisztián Kiss, Krisztina Ursu, and Ádám Dán

Porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus (PEDV) can cause a severe enteric disease affecting pigs of all ages. In January 2016, diarrhoea with occasional vomiting was observed in a small pig farm in Hungary. All animals became affected, while mortality (of up to 30%) was only seen in piglets. Samples from different age groups and the carcass of a piglet were examined by various methods including pathology, bacteriology and molecular biology. PEDV was confirmed by PCR and its whole genome sequence was determined. The sequence PEDV HUN/5031/2016 showed high identity with recently reported European viruses. Differences were found mostly in the S gene, where recombination was detected with a newly identified and already recombinant swine enteric coronavirus (Se-CoV) from Italy. The present report describes the first porcine epidemic diarrhoea outbreak in Hungary after many years and gives an insight into the genetics of the Hungarian PEDV.

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Márta Lőrincz, Attila Cságola, Imre Biksi, Levente Szeredi, Ádám Dán, and Tamás Tuboly

Porcine circoviruses (PCV) are present worldwide, infecting domestic pigs and wild boars alike. Studies under laboratory conditions indicated that PCV can be taken up by mice and the virus can replicate in these animals. The possible role of rodents in maintaining and transmitting PCV2 infection in the field has not been investigated yet. The present study reports the detection of PCV2, the pathogenic form of the virus, in mice and rats. A number of rodents, such as mice, rats and voles, were collected at PCV2-infected farms and also outside pig herds and tested for the presence of the virus by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The results indicated that PCV2 can be present both in mice and rats (65.0% and 23.8% positivity, respectively) on the infected premises, but those rodents that were collected outside pig farms remained negative for PCV2.

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Endre Sós, Alexandra Szigeti, Éva Fok, Viktor Molnár, Károly Erdélyi, Edina Perge, Imre Biksi, and János Gál

Smaller macropodid species (commonly referred to as wallabies) are extremely susceptible to toxoplasmosis: in most cases, infection with Toxoplasma gondii leads to death within a short time. Between June 2006 and July 2010, T. gondii was detected by immunohistochemical examination in six Tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii) that died in the Budapest Zoo and Botanical Garden; in another four specimens histopathology revealed T. gondii-like organisms (which could not be differentiated from Neospora caninum solely by morphology), and in another 11 animals toxoplasmosis as the possible cause of death could not be excluded. The current zoo population of 12 Tammar wallabies was tested for T. gondii IgG antibodies by the modified agglutination test (MAT), with negative results. We suppose that most of the deaths were due to acute toxoplasmosis resulting from a recent infection.

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Anna Valkó, Ervin Albert, Attila Cságola, Tünde Varga, Krisztián Kiss, Rózsa Farkas, Zsuzsanna Rónai, Imre Biksi, and Ádám Dán

Porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus (PEDV) is an emerging enteropathogen, causing great economic losses in the pig industry. After many years of quiescence, PEDV was detected in Hungary in 2016 with a recombination in its S gene. In order to determine the extent of this change, an attempt was made to isolate the recombinant PEDV. This study was extended with a variety of samples collected from three separate farms with newly identified PEDV in 2018. The recombinant PEDV from 2016 was isolated successfully along with three viruses from 2018, and one isolate from the new cases was used for whole genome determination. Whole genome sequence alignment revealed the highest identity with recombinant Hungarian and Slovenian PEDV within the low-pathogenic European viruses. This suggests that these recombinant PEDV are circulating in this area and may spread to other parts of the continent.

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Ervin Albert, Rita Sipos, Szilárd Jánosi, Péter Kovács, Árpád Kenéz, Adrienn Micsinai, Zsófia Noszály, and Imre Biksi

Abstract

The last surveys on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated from bovine milk in Hungary took place in the 2000s. To elucidate the genetic variability and to estimate the burden of the pathogen, MRSA from our strain collection and prospectively collected Staphylococcus aureus (SA) isolates originating from two milk hygiene laboratories were investigated. Between 2003 and 2018, 27 MRSA strains originating from 10 dairy farms were deposited and characterised. Most strains (n = 20) belonged to ST1-t127-SCCmecIV and were recovered from three unrelated farms. From other farms, variable genotypes were identified sporadically: ST22-t032-SCCmecIV from three farms; a newly described double locus variant of ST97, ST5982-t458-SCCmecIV from two farms; and ST398-t011-SCCmecIV and ST398-t011-SCCmecV from two respective farms. The prospective screening of 626 individual SA isolates originating from 42 dairy farms resulted in four (0.48 %) MRSA strains from three (7.14 %) farms. All MRSA isolates belonged to the clonal complex 398 and a novel spa-type t19251 was also identified. Most isolates were resistant to three or more antimicrobial classes. The occurrence and significance of MRSA of dairy origin seems to be unchanged in the past decade in Hungary. However, the low host specificity and multiresistance of the identified genotypes calls for periodic revision on the role and distribution of the pathogen in the Hungarian dairy sector.

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Dorottya Földi, Zsuzsa Kreizinger, Katinka Bekő, Nikolett Belecz, Krisztián Bányai, Krisztián Kiss, Imre Biksi, and Miklós Gyuranecz

Abstract

The control of Mycoplasma hyorhinis infection relies mainly on antimicrobial therapy. However, the antibiotic susceptibility testing of the bacteria is usually not performed before applying the treatment, and thus therapeutic failures are not uncommon. In the case of M. hyorhinis, several antibiotic-resistance-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are known but assays for their detection have not been described yet. The aims of the present study were to investigate macrolide- and lincomycin-resistance-related SNPs in Hungarian M. hyorhinis isolates and to develop mismatch amplification mutation assays (MAMA) to detect the identified resistance markers. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of different drugs and whole genome sequences of 37 M. hyorhinis isolates were used to find the resistance-related mutations. One MAMA assay was designed to detect the mutation of the 23S rRNA gene at nucleotide position 2058 (Escherichia coli numbering). For further evaluation, the assay was challenged with 17 additional isolates with available MIC data and 15 DNA samples from clinical specimens. The genotypes of the samples were in line with the MIC test results. The developed assay supports the practice of targeted antibiotic usage; hence it may indirectly reduce some bacterial resistance-related public health concerns.

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Ádám Bálint, István Kiss, Krisztián Bányai, Imre Biksi, Katalin Szentpáli-Gavallér, Tibor Magyar, István Jankovics, Mónika Rózsa, Bálint Szalai, Mária Takács, Ádám Tóth, and Ádám Dán

In 2010, two novel porcine H1N1 influenza viruses were isolated from pigs with influenza-like illness in Hungarian swine herds. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of these strains revealed that they shared molecular features with the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus strains, which emerged globally during 2009. The PB2, HA and NA genes contained unique amino acid changes compared to the available new H1N1 influenza virus sequences of pig origin. Furthermore, the investigated strains could be separated with respect to parallel amino acid substitutions affecting the polymerase genes (PB2, PB1 and PA) and the nucleoprotein (NP) gene, supporting the proposed complementarities between these proteins, all required for the viral fitness. Molecular characterisation of two Hungarian human pandemic H1N1 isolates was also performed, so that we could compare contemporaneous strains of different host species origins. Shared molecular motifs in various genes of animal and human influenza strains suggested that the Hungarian porcine strains could have originated from humans through direct interspecies transmission. This study is among the few that support the natural human-to-pig transmission of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus.

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