Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: J. E. K. Schawe x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search

The glass transitions of different materials (a silicate glass, a metallic glass, a polymer, a low molecular liquid crystal and a natural product) were investigated. By means of the temperature-modulated DSC (TM-DSC) mode, the frequency was varied. In the case of DSC, the cooling rate was changed. TM-DSC was shown to be a practicable tool for the acquisition of dynamic parameters of glass transitions for all kinds of materials.

Restricted access

The modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetric method (MT-DSC) yields three temperature dependent signals, an underlying heat capacity curve from the underlying heat flow rate (corresponding to the conventional DSC signal), and a complex heat capacity curve with a real part (storage heat capacity) and an imaginary part (loss heat capacity). These curves have been measured in the cold crystallization region for poly(ethylene terephtalate) with a modified Perkin-Elmer DSC-7. The underlying curve shows the well known large exothermic crystallization peak. The storage heat capacity shows a step change which reproduces the change in heat capacity during crystallization. This curve may be used as baseline, to separate the crystallization heat flow rate from the underlying heat flow rate curve. The loss heat capacity curve exhibits a small exothermic peak at the temperature of the step change of the storage curve. It could be caused by changes of the molecular mobility during crystallization.

Restricted access

The results from temperature modulated DSC in the glass transition region of amorphous and semicrystalline polymers are described with the linear response approach. The real and the imaginary part of the complex heat capacity are discussed. The findings are compared with those of dielectric spectroscopy. The frequency dependent glass transition temperature can be fitted with a VFT-equation. The transition frequencies are decreased by 0.5 to 1 orders of magnitude compared to dielectric measurements. Cooling rates from standard DSC are transformed into frequencies. The glass transition temperatures are also approximated by the VFT-fit from the temperature modulated measurements. The differences in the shape of the curves from amorphous and semicrystalline samples are discussed.

Restricted access