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A kinetic study of water evolution from a molten hydrated salt

The dehydration of meso lithium potassium tartrate dihydrate

Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: A. Galwey, G. Laverty, V. Okhotnikov and J. O'Neill
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Abstract  

Results of Carr and Galwey [1] concerning copper malonate (CM) decomposition in vacuo at 510 K prompted present studies on the utility of CM as a low-temperature precursor of oxide-supported copper catalysts. CM deposited upon metal oxides has been converted to copper particles by vacuum thermal decomposition or reduction with aqueous hydrazine. Using the dehydrogenation of isopropanol to acetone as a catalytic probe reaction, comparisons are made between levels of catalytic activity and selectivity induced in TiO2, MgO and Ca(OH)2 supports by copper deposited thereon. Effects of particle size, prereduction temperature, and support reducibility are described and evidence is given for a strong metal support interaction (SMSI)-like inhibition of activity of Cu/TiO2 by prior high temperature reduction.

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Performance validation of step-isothermal calorimeters

Application of a test and reference reaction

Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: B Finnin, M O'Neill, S Gaisford, A Beezer, J Hadgraft and P Sears

Abstract  

Isothermal calorimetry is becoming indispensable as a tool for the study of a wide variety of systems. As with all scientific instruments it is essential that robust calibration routines be developed in order to validate the data obtained. Chemical test reactions offer many advantages over (the traditionally used) joule effect heating methods, not least because they have the potential to validate instrument performance (i.e. they can be used to assess all aspects of calorimeter operation). In this work the results of a validation exercise, conducted by Thermal Hazard Technology as part of an installation routine, using the base catalysed hydrolysis of methyl paraben are discussed. In the case described, a systematic misreporting of the reported temperature of a calorimeter was identified, caused by an upgrade to the calorimeter's firmware, a discrepancy which may not have been noted using traditional electrical calibration methods and one which highlights the importance of both manufacturers and end-users adopting chemical test reactions into their test and validation routines.

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