Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for

  • Author or Editor: Jenő Kontschán x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

In the framework of a survey of arthropods in rest stops of Hungarian highways, 19 species of jumping plant lice were collected. Three species belong to the family Aphalaridae, one to Calophyidae, two to Liviidae, nine to Psyllidae and four to Triozidae. Two species (Livilla variegata and Trioza neglecta) are alien, non-indigenous species; the others are native to Hungary. The most abundant species were Calophya rhois, Cacopsylla melanoneura and Trioza neglecta. The specimens of C. melanoneura were found in 20, T. neglecta in 10 and C. rhois in 6 localities out of the 31 rest stops surveyed.

Open access

A new species (Rotundabaloghia (Circobaloghia)nagyi sp. nov.) of the rotundabaloghid mites is described based on females and male collected in bamboo leaf litter in Cameroon. The new species differs from the other Afrotropical rotundabaloghid mites in following character combination: female genital shield with long apical process, the setae v7 and v8 long and pilose, v6 long and smooth, v2 short and needle-like, female genital, dorsal and ventral shields are ornamented by irregular pits, sternal setae short and needle-like. This character combination is unknown within the African rotundabaloghids.

Open access

Abstract

Fifteen new occurrences of ragweed leaf beetle (Ophraella communa LeSage, 1986) are presented from Hungary based on targeted faunistic investigations and the results of our call for citizen scientists. All records are concentrated on the nearby regions of Budapest, suggesting that the species was introduced to this northern central region of the country by human activity. The high number of new occurrences indicates that the species is steadily established in this region. In contrast, the natural dispersal from the neighbouring southern countries seems not to cross the Hungarian borders yet.

Restricted access

Cimex lectularius, the common bedbug is an important, emerging pest of both veterinary and medical importance. Here a recently discovered, genetically distinct new species of the C. lectularius group is described morphologically, as Cimex pulveratus Hornok sp. nov.

Open access

The hypopi of the species Sancassania chelone Oudemans, 1916 were collected from four pest beetle species, namely Melolontha melolontha (Linnaeus, 1758); Melolontha hippocastani Fabricius, 1801; Holochelus aequinoctialis (Herbst, 1790) and Tropinota hirta Poda, 1761. The infestation rate was the highest in H. aequinoctialis (80%), while it was 50%, 28% and 13% in M. hippocastani, M. melolontha and T. hirta, respectively. The majority of the mites were found on wings in case of the two Melolontha species, in contrary, the mites were present on the abdomen of the H. aequinoctialis and T. hirta. Melolontha hippocastani Fabricius, 1801; Holochelus aequinoctialis (Herbst, 1790) and Tropinota hirta (Poda, 1761) are new host species of S. chelone.

Restricted access

A new species Nenteria lii sp. n. is described on the basis of adults and deutonymphs collected in bamboo (Phyllostachys sp.) leaf litters in Xinxiang (Henan Province, China). The new species is very similar to the species Nenteria japonensis Hiramatsu, 1979, but the apical process of the female genital shield rounded and smooth in the new taxon, but serrate in the previously described Japanese species. A new key to the Eastern-Palearctic Nenteria species is given. A list of the collected bamboo leaf litter associated mites is presented.

Restricted access

The pine pest, Cenopalpus lineola (Canestrini and Fanzago, 1876) was discovered after 45 years again in Hungary. Proto-, deutonymphs, male and female specimens were collected, therefore a new and detailed re-description are presented with description of the leg chaetotaxy of the immature stages.

Open access

Abstract

Three eriophyoid species are recorded for the first time in Hungary, viz. Paraepitrimerus erigeronsis Xue et Hong collected from Erigeron annuus (L.) Pers. (Asteraceae), Phyllocoptes parvulus (Nalepa) from Potentilla reptans L. (Rosaceae) and Aceria salicina (Nalepa) from Salix alba L. (Salicaceae). In addition, supplementary description of the vagrant phyllocoptine mite, Paraepitrimerus erigeronsis, and the deuterogynous and leaf margin rolling Aculus craspedobius (Nalepa) from Salix integra Thunb. (Salicaceae) is provided.

Restricted access

Abstract

In this study, faecal samples of four American Staffordshire terrier dogs (used for illegal fighting) were analysed by DNA extraction, molecular-phylogenetic and parasitological methods, in order to examine the occurrence of protozoan, apicomplexan parasites. In one sample, the DNA of Sarcocystis morae was shown to be present. This species was identified based on 100% identity with already reported sequences of S. morae from cervids in Lithuania and Spain. The result was also confirmed by phylogenetic analysis. The sporocysts of the canine S. morae isolate measured 14.95 × 9.75 μm on average. This is the first molecular evidence in support of the final host role of domestic dogs in the life cycle of S. morae. The most likely source of the infection was raw meat given to the examined dog to increase its physical achievement. In conclusion, under similar circumstances dogs may participate in the life cycle of S. morae in a ‘natural way’, shedding sporocysts/oocysts when used for hunting or taken to walks in forested areas.

Open access

Babesia vesperuginis is the only piroplasm known to infect bats. Unlike most members of the genus Babesia, it is probably transmitted by a soft tick species (i.e. Argas vespertilionis). Recently, two studies have been conducted to clarify the phylogenetic status of this species, and both agreed on placing it into a basal position among Babesia sensu stricto (s.s.). However, several important groups of piroplasms were not included in the already reported phylogenetic trees of B. vesperuginis isolates. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to amplify an approx. 950-bp fragment of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene of B. vesperuginis from A. vespertilionis specimens, and to compare its sequences with those from other piroplasmid groups in a broader phylogenetic context. Sequence comparisons focusing on either 18S rRNA or cox1 genes, as well as phylogenetic analyses involving separate and concatenated 18S rRNA and cox1 sequences indicate that B. vesperuginis is more closely related to the phylogenetic group of Theileriidae than to Babesia s.s. In particular, B. vesperuginis clustered closest to Cytauxzoon felis and the ‘prototheilerid’ B. conradae. The results of this study highlight that B. vesperuginis is a unique and taxonomically important species, which should be included in future studies aimed at resolving the comprehensive phylogeny of Piroplasmida.

Open access