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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Lu Li, Dan-Dan Xu, Jing-Xin Chai, Di Wang, Lin Li, Ling Zhang, Li Lu, Chee H. Ng, Gabor S. Ungvari, Song-Li Mei, and Yu-Tao Xiang

Background and aims

Internet addiction disorder (IAD) is common in university students. A number of studies have examined the prevalence of IAD in Chinese university students, but the results have been inconsistent. This is a meta-analysis of the prevalence of IAD and its associated factors in Chinese university students.

Methods

Both English (PubMed, PsycINFO, and Embase) and Chinese (Wan Fang Database and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure) databases were systematically and independently searched from their inception until January 16, 2017.

Results

Altogether 70 studies covering 122,454 university students were included in the meta-analysis. Using the random-effects model, the pooled overall prevalence of IAD was 11.3% (95% CI: 10.1%–12.5%). When using the 8-item Young Diagnostic Questionnaire, the 10-item modified Young Diagnostic Questionnaire, the 20-item Internet Addiction Test, and the 26-item Chen Internet Addiction Scale, the pooled prevalence of IAD was 8.4% (95% CI: 6.7%–10.4%), 9.3% (95% CI: 7.6%–11.4%), 11.2% (95% CI: 8.8%–14.3%), and 14.0% (95% CI: 10.6%–18.4%), respectively. Subgroup analyses revealed that the pooled prevalence of IAD was significantly associated with the measurement instrument (Q = 9.41, p = .024). Male gender, higher grade, and urban abode were also significantly associated with IAD. The prevalence of IAD was also higher in eastern and central of China than in its northern and western regions (10.7% vs. 8.1%, Q = 4.90, p = .027).

Conclusions

IAD is common among Chinese university students. Appropriate strategies for the prevention and treatment of IAD in this population need greater attention.

Open access

Abstract

A simple, rapid, and environmentally friendly sample preparation method for pyrethroids determination in cereals using cyclodextrin-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplets coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography was established. The cereal samples were extracted with acetonitrile, cleaned up, and concentrated by green extractant menthol via γ-cyclodextrin assisted extraction process. The extractant menthol dispersed as fine droplets in the cyclodextrin solution and then solidified at room temperature for efficient extraction and convenient collection. The optimized method provided good linearity in the range of 0.01–10 mg kg−1 with limits of detection of 3.5–9.5 μg kg−1. The fortified recoveries of three pyrethroids (i.e., lambda-cyhalothrin, deltamethrin, and bifenthrin) in four cereals (i.e., rice, wheat, maize, and millet) at three levels were in the range of 77.6–101.6% with relative standard deviations of 0.6–6.6%. Overall, the proposed method can be successfully applied for the determination of pyrethroids in cereals.

Open access
Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors: Chuan-Min Qi, Yong He, Xiao Wang, Man Feng, Jing-Li Xu, Rui Ding, Hang Liu, Yu-Rong Chen, Fang Li, Zhao-Hui Zhu, Yong-Hong Dang, Shu-Ting Zhang, and Ying Xie

Abstract  

d-glucosamine at concentration of certain range could kill tumor cells without influencing normal cells. There are also some reports on the antitumor activity of d-glucosamine and its derivatives in murine models. It was therefore postulated that d-glucosamine might have the potential to invade tumor cells. We designed and radiosynthesized a glucosamine derivative, N-(2-[18F]fluoro-4-nitrobenzoyl)glucosamine ([18F]FNBG([18F]7)). Evaluations in vitro and in vivo were performed on tumor bearing mice. Excitingly, the radiochemical purity of [18F]FNBG([18F]7) was 99%, and besides the best radiochemical yield was up to 35%. The best T/Bl (Tumor/Blood) and T/M (Tumor/Muscle) ratios of [18F]FNBG([18F]7) were 4.40 and 4.84. Although [18F]FNBG([18F]7) deserved further studies, the results revealed it might become a potential PET imaging agent for detecting tumors.

Restricted access
Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors: Yong He, Rui Ding, Hang Liu, Xiao Wang, Jing-Li Xu, Man Feng, Yu-Rong Chen, Chuan-Min Qi, Cheng Peng, Zhao-Hui Zhu, Yong-Hong Dang, Ming Wang, and Yun-Chuan Ma

Abstract  

As degradation product of Antineoplaston A10 in vivo, phenylacetyl glutamine showed antitumor activities. According to literatures, we designed and radiosynthesized a phenylacetyl glutamine derivative, which was achieved under a mild reaction condition. Evaluations in vitro and in vivo were performed on tumor bearing mice. Excitingly, the radiochemical purity of (S)-2-((S)-2-(4-(3-fluoropropyl)benzamido)-3-phenylpropanamido)pentanedioic acid ([18F]FBPPA) was 98%, and besides the best radiochemical yield was up to 46%. T/Bl (Tumor/Blood) and T/M (Tumor/Muscle) ratios of [18F]FBPPA at 60 min post injection were 2.33 and 3.51. Meanwhile, it showed satisfied stability in vitro and in vivo, compared with 2-[18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG). Although [18F]FBPPA deserved further studies to make optimizations on its structure, the results revealed it might become a potential PET imaging agent for detecting tumors.

Restricted access