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  • Author or Editor: Jochen Huehn x
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Upon differentiation, T cells acquire tissue-specific homing properties allowing efficient targeting of effector T cells into distinct inflamed organs. Priming of T cells within skin-draining, peripheral lymph nodes (pLNs) leads to the expression of E- and P-selectin ligands, which facilitate migration into inflamed skin, whereas activation within gut-draining, mesenteric LNs (mLNs) results in induction of chemokine receptor CCR9 and integrin α4β7, both required for migration of effector T cells into mucosal tissues. In addition to the local tissue microenvironment, both organ-specific dendritic cells and LN-resident stromal cells are critical factors to shape T cell migration properties. Here, we identify two additional homing-related molecules, CCR6 and Neuropilin-1 (Nrp1), upregulated in T cells early during differentiation solely in pLNs, but not mLNs. Surprisingly, intestinal inflammation resulted in an ameliorated induction of CCR6 and Nrp1 in pLNs, suggesting that a local inflammation within the gut can systemically alter T cell differentiation. Finally, transplantation of mLNs to a skin-draining environment revealed that LN stromal cells also contribute to efficient CCR6 induction in pLNs. Collectively, these findings identify further aspects of early T cell differentiation within skin-draining pLNs, which could be utilized to further develop tailored and highly specialized vaccination strategies.

Open access

Abstract

Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) is a food-borne pathogen with a high chance of infecting neonates, pregnant women, elderly and immunocompromised individuals. Lm infection in neonates can cause neonatal meningitis and sepsis with a high risk of severe neurological and developmental sequelae and high mortality rates. However, whether an acute neonatal Lm infection causes long-term effects on the immune system persisting until adulthood has not been fully elucidated. Here, we established a neonatal Lm infection model and monitored the composition of major immune cell subsets at defined time points post infection (p.i.) in secondary lymphoid organs and the intestine. Twelve weeks p.i., the CD8+ T cell population was decreased in colon and mesenteric lymph nodes (mLNs) with an opposing increase in the spleen. In the colon, we observed an accumulation of CD4+ and CD8+ effector/memory T cells with an increase of T-bet+ T helper 1 (Th1) cells. In addition, 12 weeks p.i. an altered composition of innate lymphoid cell (ILC) and dendritic cell (DC) subsets was still observed in colon and mLNs, respectively. Together, these findings highlight organ-specific long-term consequences of an acute neonatal Lm infection on both the adaptive and innate immune system.

Open access

Abstract

Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) hamper efficient immune responses to tumors and chronic infections. Therefore, depletion of Foxp3+ Tregs has been proposed as therapeutic option to boost immune responses and to improve vaccinations. Although Treg-mediated control of T cell homeostasis is well established, Foxp3+ Treg interaction with other immune cell subsets is only incompletely understood. Thus, the present study aimed at examining dynamic effects of experimental Foxp3+ Treg depletion on a broad range of immune cell subsets, including B cells, natural killer cells, and myeloid cells. Striking differences were observed when peripheral lymph nodes (LN) and spleen were compared. B cells, for example, showed a massive and long-lasting accumulation only in LN but not in spleen of transiently Treg-depleted mice. In contrast, monocyte-derived dendritic cells, which are potent inducers of T cell responses, also accumulated selectively, but only transiently in LN, suggesting that this cell population is under very strict control of Foxp3+ Tregs. In summary, the observations described here provide insights into the dynamics of immune cells after selective depletion of Foxp3+ Tregs. This will allow a better prediction of the impact of Treg ablation in translational studies that aim at boosting immune responses and vaccinations.

Restricted access
European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology
Authors: Sascha Cording, Diana Fleissner, Markus M. Heimesaat, Stefan Bereswill, Christoph Loddenkemper, Satoshi Uematsu, Shizuo Akira, Alf Hamann and Jochen Huehn

Abstract

Compelling evidence demonstrates that intestinal commensal microbiota modulate conventional and regulatory T cell (Treg) responses that are required for effective host defence against pathogens and avoidance of autoimmunity and other immunopathologic conditions. Here, we investigated the contribution of the commensal microbiota and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling to homeostasis of Foxp3 conventional CD4+ T cells and Foxp3+ Tregs. Upon long-term antibiotics treatment, we observed a significant reduction of conventional CD4+ T cell proliferation in a systemic manner, whereas Foxp3+ Treg proliferation was locally impaired in gut-draining mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer's patches. The proliferative response to microbial components was not mediated by TLRs as MyD88- and various TLR-deficient mice displayed normal or even increased conventional T cell and Foxp3+ Treg proliferation. Thus, commensal microbiota-derived stimuli support cycling of both conventional CD4+ T cells and Foxp3+ Tregs with TLR-mediated recognition of bacterial components not being the major mechanism controlling microbiota-driven T cell homeostasis.

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European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology
Authors: Jana Niemz, Stefanie Kliche, Marina C. Pils, Eliot Morrison, Annika Manns, Christian Freund, Jill R. Crittenden, Ann M. Graybiel, Melanie Galla, Lothar Jänsch and Jochen Huehn

Using quantitative phosphopeptide sequencing of unstimulated versus stimulated primary murine Foxp3+ regulatory and Foxp3 conventional T cells (Tregs and Tconv, respectively), we detected a novel and differentially regulated tyrosine phosphorylation site within the C1 domain of the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor CalDAG GEFI. We hypothesized that the Treg-specific and activation-dependent reduced phosphorylation at Y523 allows binding of CalDAG GEFI to diacylglycerol, thereby impacting the formation of a Treg-specific immunological synapse. However, diacylglycerol binding assays of phosphomutant C1 domains of CalDAG GEFI could not confirm this hypothesis. Moreover, CalDAG GEFI−/− mice displayed normal Treg numbers in thymus and secondary lymphoid organs, and CalDAG GEFI−/− Tregs showed unaltered in vitro suppressive capacity when compared to CalDAG GEFI+/+ Tregs. Interestingly, when tested in vivo, CalDAG GEFI−/− Tregs displayed a slightly reduced suppressive ability in the transfer colitis model when compared to CalDAG GEFI+/+ Tregs. Additionally, CRISPR-Cas9-generated CalDAG GEFI−/− Jurkat T cell clones showed reduced adhesion to ICAM-1 and fibronectin when compared to CalDAG GEFI-competent Jurkat T cells. Therefore, we speculate that deficiency in CalDAG GEFI impairs adherence of Tregs to antigen-presenting cells, thereby impeding formation of a fully functional immunological synapse, which finally results in a reduced suppressive potential.

Open access
European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology
Authors: Ahmed Elfiky, Agnes Bonifacius, Joern Pezoldt, Maria Pasztoi, Paweena Chaoprasid, Pooja Sadana, Nagla El-Sherbeeny, Magda Hagras, Andrea Scrima, Petra Dersch and Jochen Huehn

Adaptive immunity is essentially required to control acute infection with enteropathogenic Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (Yptb). We have recently demonstrated that Yptb can directly modulate naïve CD4+ T cell differentiation. However, whether fully differentiated forkhead box protein P3 (Foxp3+) regulatory T cells (Tregs), fundamental key players to maintain immune homeostasis, are targeted by Yptb remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that within the CD4+ T cell compartment Yptb preferentially targets Tregs and injects Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) in a process that depends on the type III secretion system and invasins. Remarkably, Yop-translocation into ex vivo isolated Foxp3+ Tregs resulted in a substantial downregulation of Foxp3 expression and a decreased capacity to express the immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). Together, these findings highlight that invasins are critically required to mediate Yptb attachment to Foxp3+ Tregs, which allows efficient Yop-translocation and finally enables the modulation of the Foxp3+ Tregs' suppressive phenotype.

Open access