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Abstract  

Certain bacterial strains can be employed in the removal of heavy metals from the environment. The aim of this study was to screen potential bacteria that were tolerant towards Cu and Cd and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was used to determine the concentrations of heavy metals in the sludge samples. The sludge samples from oil refinery plant in Malaysia contained Cr, Cs, Cu, Eu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Sb, Sc, Th, U and Zn. Seven bacterial isolates were identified to be tolerant to 100 mg/kg of copper and cadmium.

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The complete chloroplast (cp) genome sequence of Pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum [L.] R. Br.), an important grain and forage crop in the family Poaceae, is reported in this study. The complete cp genome sequence of P. glaucum is 138,172 bp in length with 38.6% overall GC content and exhibits a typical quadripartite structure comprising one pair of inverted repeat (IR) regions (22,275 bp) separated by a small single-copy (SSC) region (12,409 bp) and a large single-copy (LSC) region (81,213). The P. glaucum cp genome encodes 110 unique genes, 76 of which are protein-coding genes, 4 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, 30 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes and 18 duplicated genes in the IR region. Nine genes contain one or two introns. Whole genome alignments of cp genome were performed for genome-wide comparison. Locally collinear blocks (LCBs) identified among the cp genomes showed that they were well conserved with respect to gene organization and order. This newly determined cp genome sequence of P. glaucum will provide valuable information for the future breeding programs of valuable cereal crops in the family Poaceae.

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Summary  

Minerals in the soil range from those that easily weather to those that are very resistant to the weathering processes. The minerals used in this study are referred to as “resistates” because of their resistance to natural weathering processes.1 It is also known that there are some resistate minerals that have a tendency to contain uranium and thorium within their crystal structure. These resistates can contain as much as 15-20% of the total uranium and thorium present in the soil.9 Do resistates dissolve in acids, particularly in the HF/HNO3 procedures, if not what can be done to the HF/HNO3 process to dissolve more of the resistate minerals? How would these acid techniques compare to the fusion method used for mineral dissolution? Could the resistate minerals contain considerable amount of uranium and thorium? These were the questions addressed in this research. The comparative data indicate that the use of H2SO4 in the dissolution process resulted in ~25% overall increase in the minerals dissolving therefore resulting in a higher yield of extracted uranium and thorium.

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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors:
D. Hoffman
,
R. Henderson
,
K. Gregorich
,
D. Bennett
,
R. Chasteler
,
C. Gannett
,
H. Hall
,
D. Lee
,
M. Nurmia
,
S. Cai
,
R. Agarwal
,
A. Charlop
,
Y. Chu
,
G. Seaborg
, and
R. Silva

Abstract  

The isotope260Lr, produced in reactions of18O with249Bk, was used to perform chemical experiments on lawrencium to learn more about its chemical properties. These experiments involved extractions with thenoyl trifluoroacetate, elutions from cation exchange resin columns with ammonium alpha-hydroxyisobutyrate, and reverse-phase chromatography using hydrogen di(2-ethylhexyl) orthophosphoric acid to investigate the chemical properties of Lr. The results from the elutions gave information about the ionic radius of Lr(III) which was found to elute very close to Er. An attempt to reduce Lr(III) with hydroxylamine hydrochloride was unsuccessful.

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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors:
B. Wierczinski
,
K. Gregorich
,
B. Kadkhodayan
,
D. Lee
,
L. Beauvais
,
M. Hendricks
,
C. Kacher
,
M. Lane
,
D. Keeney-Shaughnessy
,
N. Stoyer
,
D. Strellis
,
E. Sylwester
,
P. Wilk
,
D. Hoffman
,
R. Malmbeck
,
G. Skarnemark
,
J. Alstad
,
J. Omtvedt
,
K. Eberhardt
,
M. Mendel
,
A. Nähler
, and
N. Trautmann

Abstract  

Subsecond 224 Pa (T 1/2 = 0.85 s) was produced via the 209 Bi(18 O,3n)224 Pa reaction at the 88 inch cyclotron at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. After production it was transported via a gas-jet system to the centrifuge system SISAK 3. Following on-line extraction with trioctylamine/scintillation solutions from 1M lactic acid, 224 Pa was detected applying on-line -liquid scintillation counting. Unambiguous identification was achieved using time-correlated --decay chain analysis. This constitutes the first chemical on-line separation and detection of a subsecond -decaying nuclide, 0.85-s 224 Pa with the fast extraction system SISAK 3.

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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors:
A. Türler
,
H. Gäggeler
,
K. Gregorich
,
H. Barth
,
W. Brüchle
,
K. Czerwinski
,
M. Gober
,
N. Hannink
,
R. Henderson
,
D. Hoffman
,
D. Jost
,
C. Kacher
,
B. Kadkhodayan
,
J. Kovacs
,
J. Kratz
,
S. Kreek
,
D. Lee
,
J. Leyba
,
M. Nurmia
,
M. Schädel
,
U. Scherer
,
Schimpf
,
D. Vermeulen
,
A. Weber
,
H. Zimmermann
, and
I. Zvara

Abstract  

On-line isothermal gas phase chromatography was used to study halides of261104 (T1/2=65 s) and262,263105 (T1/2=34 s and 27 s) produced an atom-at-a time via the reactions248Cm(18O, 5n) and249Bk(18O, 5n, 4n), respectively. Using HBr and HCl gas as halogenating agents, we were able to produce volatile bromides and chlorides of the above mentioned elements and study their behavior compared to their lighter homologs in Groups 4 or 5 of the periodic table. Element 104 formed more volatile bromide than its homolog Hf. In contrast, element 105 bromides were found to be less volatile than the bromides of the group 5 elements Nb and Ta. Both 104 and Hf chlorides were observed to be more volatile than their respective bromides.

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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors:
P. Povinec
,
M. Pham
,
J. Sanchez-Cabeza
,
G. Barci-Funel
,
R. Bojanowski
,
T. Boshkova
,
W. Burnett
,
F. Carvalho
,
B. Chapeyron
,
I. Cunha
,
H. Dahlgaard
,
N. Galabov
,
L. Fifield
,
J. Gastaud
,
J. Geering
,
I. Gomez
,
N. Green
,
T. Hamilton
,
F. Ibanez
,
M. Ibn Majah
,
M. John
,
G. Kanisch
,
T. Kenna
,
M. Kloster
,
M. Korun
,
L. Liong Wee Kwong
,
J. La Rosa
,
S. Lee
,
I. Levy-Palomo
,
M. Malatova
,
Y. Maruo
,
P. Mitchell
,
I. Murciano
,
R. Nelson
,
A. Nouredine
,
J. Oh
,
B. Oregioni
,
G. Le Petit
,
H. Pettersson
,
A. Reineking
,
P. Smedley
,
A. Suckow
,
T. van der Struijs
,
P. Voors
,
K. Yoshimizu
, and
E. Wyse

Abstract  

A reference material designed for the determination of anthropogenic and natural radionuclides in sediment, IAEA-384 (Fangataufa Lagoon sediment), is described and the results of certification are presented. The material has been certified for 8 radionuclides (40K, 60Co, 155Eu, 230Th, 238U, 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am). Information values are given for 12 radionuclides (90Sr, 137Cs, 210Pb (210Po), 226Ra, 228Ra, 232Th, 234U, 235U, 239Pu, 240Pu and 241Pu). Less reported radionuclides include 228Th, 236U, 239Np and 242Pu. The reference material may be used for quality management of radioanalytical laboratories engaged in the analysis of radionuclides in the environment, as well as for the development and validation of analytical methods and for training purposes. The material is available from IAEA in 100 g units.

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