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  • Author or Editor: K. Soliman x
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Abstract  

Food samples were irradiated with thermal and epithermal neutrons. The average ratios of thermal to epithermal activity were determined for80Br,49Ca,38Cl,60mCo,42K,27Mg,56Mn,24Na, and86mRB. They were equal to 2.1, 26, 24, 6.6, 19, 16, 11, 23 and 1.9, respectively. Then, 57 food samples were analyzed by epithermal neutron activation analysis for Br and Rb. The concentrations (in ppm) of Br and Rb were in asparagus (2) 2.3, 11.5; beets (3) 0.5, 0.8; beef (3) 1.7, 3.6; cabbage (5) 0.5, 10.8; carrot (3) 0.2, 3.7; chicken (3) 0.6, 4.4; chocolate (7) 11.1, 18.7; egg (3) 0.9, 1.9; french bean (3) 0.3, 1.0; goose (2) 1.3, 9.3; lettuce (2) 0.9, 1.7; pork (1) 1.5, 4.4; potato (7) 1.0, 1.2; sausage (3) 0.6, 4.0; strawberry jam (3) 0.4, 1.4; tomato (1) 13.5, 14.6; turkey (3) 1.2, 4.9. respectively. The number of samples analyzed is indicated in parentheses.

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Abstract  

The concentration of Al in 440 food samples, measured with neutron activation analysis, varies from 0.1 to 40.7 ppm. A typical Canadian absorbs 6.17 mg of Al daily due to his diet. Aluminum in food contributes from 12 to 20% of the total Al intake.

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Abstract  

The concentrations of 5 elements in 117 food samples were determined by computerized instrumental absolute neutron activation analysis. The daily dietary intakes of Br, Ca, Cl, Co and K in Montreal, Canada were equal to 1.9, 330, 1030, 0.07 and 3490 mg, respectively. The Canadian daily dietary intakes of Br and K are similar to the intakes in other countries. They are lower for Ca and higher for Co.

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Abstract  

The concentrations of Br, Ca, Cl, Cu, I, K, Mg, Na, Rb, S and Ti in 44 samples of cheese, eggs, fish, fowl and meats sold in Canada were determined with absolute instrumental neutron activation analysis. The procedure is fully computerized and incorporates one short irradiation and counting only. When an element was not detected, its detection limit was calculated. The nuclear interferences and blanks were taken into account. The nutritional significance of the results is discussed.

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