Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for

  • Author or Editor: Katalin Burián x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) major immediate-early (MIE) gene is not transcribed in undifferentiated NTera-2 embryonal carcinoma cells, but is transcribed in their differentiated derivatives, offering a model with which to study the developmental regulation of the activity of a viral gene during the differentiation of these cells. The molecular mechanisms involved in the blockade of the MIE gene expression in undifferentiated NTera2 cells include covalent closure of the circular conformation of the viral genome, silencing of the viral MIE promoter by histone deacetylation, and increases in the expression of negatively regulating transcription factors responsible for the recruitment of the histone deacytylases around the viral MIE promoter (MIEP), resulting in repression of the MIEP in undifferentiated cells. The treatment of NTera2 cells with retinoic acid induces the differentiation of these cells. In HCMV-infected differentiated NTera2 cells, the MIEP becomes associated with hyperacetylated histones, which results in an open structure of chromatin, enhancing the access of DNA- binding factors which positively regulate MIE gene expression and viral replication. This model system contributes to an understanding of HCMV latency and reactivation in vivo in the cells of the myeloid lineage.

Restricted access

The inability of traditional risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and smoking to explain the incidence of atherosclerosis (AT) in about 50% of the cases prompted a  search for additional putative risk factors involved in the development of the disease. Infectious agents have long been suspected to initiate/contribute to the process of AT. It has also been suggested that inflammation, either related to infectious agents or independent from infection,  may mediate the atherogenic process [1, 2].

Restricted access
Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Authors: Ildikó Faludi, Ágnes Szabó, Katalin Burián, Valéria Endrész, and A. Miczák

Mycobacterium smegmatis is a species of rapidly growing saprophytes with a number of properties that make it an effective vaccine vector. Recombinant M. smegmatis expressing protective antigens of different pathogens and molecules modulating the immune responses offers some potential for reduction of the burden of tuberculosis, HIV and hepatitis B infections. This paper discusses the molecular methods used to generate recombinant M. smegmatis and the results obtained with some of these recombinants.

Restricted access
Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Authors: Ildikó Faludi, Ágnes Csanádi, Ágnes Szabó, Katalin Burián, Valéria Endrész, and A. Miczák

Chlamydophila pneumoniae possesses a type III secretion system (TTSS), which allows the bacteria to secrete effector molecules into the inclusion membrane and into the cytosol of the host cell. Low calcium response protein H (LcrH), as a part of the TTSS, is a chaperone protein expressed from the middle to late stages of the chlamydial developmental cycle. Gene of LcrH (CPn0811) in a 6His-tagged form was cloned from C. pneumoniae CWL029, expressed and purified from Escherichia coli using the HIS-select TALON CellThru Resin. The purity was checked with mass spectrometry. The samples were used for immunization of BALB/c mice. The inducible E. coli clone, which over-expresses the chlamydial LcrH, permits the study of the biological properties of this protein.

Restricted access
Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Authors: Emese Balogh, Tímea Mosolygó, Hilda Tiricz, Ágnes Szabó, Adrienn Karai, Fanni Kerekes, Dezső Virók, Éva Kondorosi, and Katalin Burián

Even in asymptomatic cases of Chlamydia trachomatis infection, the aim of the antibiotic strategy is eradication of the pathogen so as to avoid the severe late sequelae, such as pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, and tubal infertility. Although first-line antimicrobial agents have been demonstrated to be predominantly successful in the treatment of C. trachomatis infection, treatment failures have been observed in some cases. Rich source of antimicrobial peptides was recently discovered in Medicago species, which act in plants as differentiation factors of the endosymbiotic bacterium partner. Several of these symbiotic plant peptides have proved to be potent killers of various bacteria in vitro. We show here that 7 of 11 peptides tested exhibited antimicrobial activity against C. trachomatis D, and that the killing activity of these peptides is most likely due to their interaction with specific bacterial targets.

Restricted access
Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Authors: Márió Gajdács, Marianna Ábrók, Andrea Lázár, Laura Jánvári, Ákos Tóth, Gabriella Terhes, and Katalin Burián

Abstract

Infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacterales (CRE) present an important therapeutic problem, as there are limited number of effective therapeutic alternatives available. In this study, phenotypic and genotypic methods were used to characterize carbapenemase-production and other resistance-determinants (AmpC and ESBL-production, efflux pump-overexpression) in 50 isolates (Klebsiella spp. n = 35, Escherichia coli n = 12 and Enterobacter cloacae complex n = 3) collected at the Albert Szent-Györgyi Clinical Center (University of Szeged) between 2014 and 2017. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of meropenem, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, tigecycline, amikacin, moxifloxacin, colistin and fosfomycin were also determined. 24% of isolates were AmpC-producers, while 30% carried bla CTX-M ESBL-genes. Carbapenemase-genes were detected in 18 (36%) of the tested isolates: in 2 isolates bla NDM, in 6 isolates bla OXA-48-like and in 12 isolates, bla VIM was detected by PCR. The species-distribution for isolates positive for carbapenemase-genes was the following: Klebsiella pneumoniae n = 11, Klebsiella oxytoca n = 1, E. coli n = 5, E. cloacae complex n = 1. Efflux pump-overexpression based on the PAβN-screening agar was shown in n = 3 of the tested strains. In nine isolates (18%), carbapenemase and ESBL-genes were detected simultaneously. Highest levels of resistance were noted for fosfomycin (74%) and moxifloxacin (70%), while all isolates were susceptible to colistin. Among applied phenotypic tests in this study the modified carbapenem inactivation method (mCIM) proved to be the most accurate one compared to that of PCR results.

Open access

Abstract

Bacteria can enhance their survival by attaching to inanimate surfaces or tissues, and presenting as multicellular communities encased in a protective extracellular matrix called biofilm. There has been pronounced interest in assessing the relationship between the antibiotic resistant phenotype and biofilm-production in clinically-relevant pathogens. The aim of the present paper was to provide additional experimental results on the topic, testing the biofilm-forming capacity of Escherichia coli isolates using in vitro methods in the context of their antibiotic resistance in the form of a laboratory case study, in addition to provide a comprehensive review of the subject. In our case study, a total of two hundred and fifty (n = 250) E. coli isolates, originating from either clean-catch urine samples (n = 125) or invasive samples (n = 125) were included. The colony morphology of isolates were recorded after 24h, while antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Biofilm-formation of the isolates was assessed with the crystal violet tube-adherence method. Altogether 57 isolates (22.8%) isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR), 89 isolates (35.6%) produced large colonies (>3 mm), mucoid variant colonies were produced in 131 cases (52.4%), and 108 (43.2%) were positive for biofilm formation. Biofilm-producers were less common among isolates resistant to third-generation cephalosporins and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (P = 0.043 and P = 0.023, respectively). Biofilms facilitate a protective growth strategy in bacteria, ensuring safety against environmental stressors, components of the immune system and noxious chemical agents. Being an integral part of bacterial physiology, biofilm-formation is interdependent with the expression of other virulence factors (especially adhesins) and quorum sensing signal molecules. More research is required to allow for the full understanding of the interplay between the MDR phenotype and biofilm-production, which will facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

Open access
Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Authors: D. Virok, Z. Kis, L. Kari, P. Barzo, R. Sipka, Katalin Burian, D. E. Nelson, Marta Jackel, T. Kerenyi, M. Bodosi, Eva Gönczöl, and Valeria Endresz

The aim of our study was to investigate the combination of Chlamydophila pneumoniae and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) as a pathogenic factor in atherosclerosis. Accordingly, we tested by means of PCR and immunohistochemistry the presence of these pathogens in the same atherosclerotic carotid specimen. The histology of the samples and the patients' antibodies against these pathogens were evaluated. Further, we examined the impact of C. pneumoniae and HCMV infection on the gene expression of the human monocytic cell line U937. Six of the 22 samples contained only C. pneumoniae, 4 contained only HCMV, 7 contained both C. pneumoniae DNA and/or antigens of both pathogens, and 5 samples were negative. No correlation was found between the presence of these microbes and either the cellular structure of the plaques, or the serostatus of the patients. The infection of U937 cells with HCMV and especially C. pneumoniae induced inflammation and atherosclerosis-related genes. Furthermore, the doubly-infected cells produced higher levels of the mRNA of pro-platelet basic protein and fatty acid binding protein 4. In conclusion, C. pneumoniae is often present in combination with HCMV in atherosclerotic carotid lesions. The in vitro coinfection model reveals that the doubly-infected monocytes are potent expressors of proatherosclerotic genes, suggesting that this coinfected population may accelerate the process of atherosclerosis.

Restricted access