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  • Author or Editor: Kune-Woo Lee x
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Abstract  

Type 304 stainless steel specimens artificially contaminated with CsCl solution were treated with KOH solution and KNO3 solution, respectively. Cs+ ion removal tests by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm at a given fluence of 57.3 J/cm2 were performed. The surface morphology and the relative atomic mole ratio of the specimen surface were investigated by SEM and EPMA. The order of Cs+ ion removal efficiency of laser was no-treatment < KOH < KNO3 during the 42 shots. From the investigation of XPS peaks around 532.7 and 292.9 eV, KNO3 on a surface of specimen was found to be fully decomposed during the laser irradiation. It was suggested that Cs2O particulates formed by the reaction between the reactive oxygen generated from the nitrate ion and Cs+ ion on the metal surface could be easily suspended. For the KOH system, FeOOH was formed during the laser irradiation and it changed into Fe2O3. It was also suggested that Cs2O particulates were formed by the reaction between the reactive oxygen generated from the decomposition of K2O and Cs+ ion on the metal surface..

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Abstract  

This work studied a way to reclaim uranium from contaminated UO2 oxide scraps as a sinterable UO2 powder for UO2 fuel pellet fabrication, which included a dissolution of the uranium oxide scraps in a carbonate solution with hydrogen peroxide and a UO4 precipitation step. Dissolution characteristics of reduced and oxidized uranium oxides were evaluated in a carbonate solution with hydrogen peroxide, and the UO4 precipitation were confirmed by acidification of uranyl peroxo–carbonate complex solution. An agglomerated UO4 powder obtained by the dissolution and precipitation of uranium in the carbonate solution could not be pulverized into fine UO2 powder by the OREOX process, because of submicron-sized individual UO4 particles forming the agglomerated UO4 precipitate. The UO2 powder prepared from the UO4 precipitate could meet the UO2 powder specifications for UO2 fuel pellet fabrication by a series of steps such as dehydration of UO4 precipitate, reduction, and milling. The sinterability of the reclaimed UO2 powder for fuel pellet fabrication was improved by adding virgin UO2 powder in the reclaimed UO2 powder. A process to reclaim the contaminated uranium scraps as UO2 fuel powder using a carbonate solution was finally suggested.

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