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At the beginning of the 19th century, when the poets wanted to create the national epic poem of Hungarians, they followed the Aeneid; at the end of the 18th century, when the agricultural reform was established in Hungary under the Habsburgs, the poets wrote agricultural poems in Vergilian form and translated and modernized his Georgics. The world of Vergil depicted in the Eclogues and in the Georgics became the idealized Arcadia, and poets and writers or the aristocracy — influenced by Vergil — wanted to create their own Arcadia. The pastoral theme and the bucolical forms were very popular in Hungarian literature of this period, at the end of the 18th century. The poets had pastoral names, and very different topics were expressed in eclogues (e.g. actual events of politics). In the first half of the 20th century Vergil had a new renaissance connected to the bimillennium of his birth. And this renaissance reached the most expressive element of the presence of Vergil’s Bucolics in the poetry of Miklós Radnóti (1909–1944), whose eclogues are the most tragic expression of cruelty of war. My paper focuses on the influence of Virgil’s Bucolics in Radnóti’s poetry, but his examples can attest to the deep influence of Vergil on Hungarian literature.

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In Chapter 24 of Tacitus’ Agricola the historian claims — as it is frequently mentioned in the various editions of this work — that he heard his father-in-law discuss the easy invasion of Ireland (Hibernia) many times. In this paper the author attempts to demonstrate that the Zweibrücken-edition of the Agricola offers a more plausible text-variation.

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L. Annaeus Cornutus - a késő-ókori grammatikusnál, Charisiusnál fennmaradt töredék alapján - Vegiliusról szóló kritikai művét Silius Italicusnak, a Punicacímű eposz szerzőjének ajánlotta, aki ifjúkorában Nero költői köréhez tartozott. Nero irodalmi köre történetének ismeretében és a töredék részletes elemzése alapján feltételezhető, hogy Cornutus ezt a művét, amelyet az idősebb Plinius idézhetett Dubius sermocímű művében, alighanem a 60-as évek elején írta és jelentette meg.

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As testified by a fragment, which survived in the oeuvre of Charisius, a grammarian from the late Antiquity, L. Annaeus Cornutus dedicated his critical work on Virgil to Silius Italicus, the author of the epic entitled Punica, who belonged to Nero's circle of literati in his youth. Given the knowledge of the history of Nero's literary circle and the findings of a careful examination of the fragment, it can be assumed that this work of Cornutus, which might have been quoted by Pliny the Elder in his Dubius sermo, was probably written and published in the early 60s (A.D.).

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All the actors in Octavia, a pseudo-Senecan drama, are afraid of something. Only the Roman people are capable of overcoming their fears and of supporting the emperor's rejected wife and this eventually leads to their fall. Octavia, who enjoys the people's sympathy, nonetheless remains passive. Her passivity can be interpreted as a form of resistance through inactivity - she considers this the only means of preventing the impending marriage between Nero and Poppea.

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Metamorphosis and Disruption

Comments on Seneca's 114th Epistula Moralis

Acta Antiqua Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Author:
László Takács

Seneca, in the 114th piece of his Moral letters (written most probably in the fall of 64 A.D.), evokes a part of Virgil's Georgics, which he already quoted and construed more than 10 years earlier in De clementia, addressed to Nero. At the same time, he lashes out on Maecenas. Since Seneca mentions such characteristics of Maecenas that, according to historical sources, resemble some of Nero's actions, and since he evokes a fragment already analyzed for Nero, it seems very likely that the letter should be viewed as the philosopher-statesman's critique of Nero.

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According to the ancient biography of Persius the poet left his book containing the satires unfinished. The text was emended by L. Annaeus Cornutus, the satirists master and friend, and the book was published by his friend, the poet Caesius Bassus. Because there is not any information of the form of Persius’book at the time of his premature death, the paper is focusing on the question: which principle is the book composition of satires based on?

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