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Abstract  

The study employed isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) technique to investigate the interactions between a skin penetration enhancer, laurocapram, and three representatives of the human stratum corneum (SC) intercellular lipids, i.e., ceramide-3, cholesterol and behenic acid. Experiments were performed using a TAM2277 (Thermometric AB, Sweden) calorimeter. Results showed that, firstly, two laurocapram molecules were bound to one ceramide-3 molecule in propylene glycol solution. The binding was enthalpy-driven and system entropy decreased after binding. Secondly, the binding ratio between cholesterol and laurocapram molecule was one to one. It was mainly an entropy-driven process, suggesting the ordered cholesterol molecules in SC lamella were disturbed by the introduction of laurocapram. Hydrogen bonding might be the main force of the binding. The three different interaction modes showed that the chemical enhancers selectively interacted with the components of SC lipids so that the SC can still retain its barrier function.

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The objective of this study was to investigate whether baboon females respond to an ovarian stimulation protocol incorporating pituitary suppression with a GnRH agonist (GnRHa) and either highly purified human FSH (hphFSH) or recombinant human FSH (rhFSH) with follicular development and oocyte maturation. A modified human ovulation induction protocol was applied to 5 adult female baboons with a history of regular menstrual cycles (33–34 days). A long-acting GnRHa implant containing goserelin acetate was placed subcutaneously (s.c.) on Days 22–24 of their menstrual cycle. Concentrations of serum oestradiol (E2), progesterone (P4) and human FSH were obtained by ELISA. Menses occurred ∼ 10 days after GnRHa implantation. Daily hphFSH or rhFSH (75 IU i.m.) treatments were started ∼ 10 days following menses. When the majority of follicles were ≥ 5 mm in diameter and the E2 levels had reached a maximum, hCG (2000 IU i.m.) was administered to induce final maturation of oocytes and ovulation. Thirty to 34 h after hCG administration, transabdominal follicular aspiration was performed using a variable frequency transvaginal transducer with ultrasound. A total of 71 oocytes were collected from 4 animals (average: 17). The meiotic maturity of oocytes was evaluated 3 h after retrieval. Ninety-one percent of oocytes were in metaphase 2 and of grades I and II which are appropriate for in vitro insemination.

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Saccharomyces cerevisiae MERIT.ferm was used as mono- and mixed-cultures with Williopsis saturnus var. mrakii NCYC500 in mango wine fermentation. A ratio of 1:1000 (Saccharomyces:Williopsis) was chosen for mixed-culture fermentation to enable longer persistence of the latter. The monoculture of S. cerevisiae and mixed-culture was able to ferment to dryness with 7.0% and 7.7% ethanol, respectively. The monoculture of W. mrakii produced 1.45% ethanol. The mango wines fermented by S. cerevisiae alone and the mixed-culture were more yeasty and winey, which reflected their higher amounts of fusel alcohols, ethyl esters and medium-chain fatty acids. The mango wine fermented by W. mrakii alone was much less alcoholic, but fruitier, sweeter, which corresponded to its higher levels of acetate esters.

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
John B. Saunders
,
Wei Hao
,
Jiang Long
,
Daniel L. King
,
Karl Mann
,
Mira Fauth-Bühler
,
Hans-Jürgen Rumpf
,
Henrietta Bowden-Jones
,
Afarin Rahimi-Movaghar
,
Thomas Chung
,
Elda Chan
,
Norharlina Bahar
,
Sophia Achab
,
Hae Kook Lee
,
Marc Potenza
,
Nancy Petry
,
Daniel Spritzer
,
Atul Ambekar
,
Jeffrey Derevensky
,
Mark D. Griffiths
,
Halley M. Pontes
,
Daria Kuss
,
Susumu Higuchi
,
Satoko Mihara
,
Sawitri Assangangkornchai
,
Manoj Sharma
,
Ahmad El Kashef
,
Patrick Ip
,
Michael Farrell
,
Emanuele Scafato
,
Natacha Carragher
, and
Vladimir Poznyak

Online gaming has greatly increased in popularity in recent years, and with this has come a multiplicity of problems due to excessive involvement in gaming. Gaming disorder, both online and offline, has been defined for the first time in the draft of 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11). National surveys have shown prevalence rates of gaming disorder/addiction of 10%–15% among young people in several Asian countries and of 1%–10% in their counterparts in some Western countries. Several diseases related to excessive gaming are now recognized, and clinics are being established to respond to individual, family, and community concerns, but many cases remain hidden. Gaming disorder shares many features with addictions due to psychoactive substances and with gambling disorder, and functional neuroimaging shows that similar areas of the brain are activated. Governments and health agencies worldwide are seeking for the effects of online gaming to be addressed, and for preventive approaches to be developed. Central to this effort is a need to delineate the nature of the problem, which is the purpose of the definitions in the draft of ICD-11.

Open access

Including gaming disorder in the ICD-11: The need to do so from a clinical and public health perspective

Commentary on: A weak scientific basis for gaming disorder: Let us err on the side of caution (van Rooij et al., 2018)

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Hans-Jürgen Rumpf
,
Sophia Achab
,
Joël Billieux
,
Henrietta Bowden-Jones
,
Natacha Carragher
,
Zsolt Demetrovics
,
Susumu Higuchi
,
Daniel L. King
,
Karl Mann
,
Marc Potenza
,
John B. Saunders
,
Max Abbott
,
Atul Ambekar
,
Osman Tolga Aricak
,
Sawitri Assanangkornchai
,
Norharlina Bahar
,
Guilherme Borges
,
Matthias Brand
,
Elda Mei-Lo Chan
,
Thomas Chung
,
Jeff Derevensky
,
Ahmad El Kashef
,
Michael Farrell
,
Naomi A. Fineberg
,
Claudia Gandin
,
Douglas A. Gentile
,
Mark D. Griffiths
,
Anna E. Goudriaan
,
Marie Grall-Bronnec
,
Wei Hao
,
David C. Hodgins
,
Patrick Ip
,
Orsolya Király
,
Hae Kook Lee
,
Daria Kuss
,
Jeroen S. Lemmens
,
Jiang Long
,
Olatz Lopez-Fernandez
,
Satoko Mihara
,
Nancy M. Petry
,
Halley M. Pontes
,
Afarin Rahimi-Movaghar
,
Florian Rehbein
,
Jürgen Rehm
,
Emanuele Scafato
,
Manoi Sharma
,
Daniel Spritzer
,
Dan J. Stein
,
Philip Tam
,
Aviv Weinstein
,
Hans-Ulrich Wittchen
,
Klaus Wölfling
,
Daniele Zullino
, and
Vladimir Poznyak

The proposed introduction of gaming disorder (GD) in the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) has led to a lively debate over the past year. Besides the broad support for the decision in the academic press, a recent publication by van Rooij et al. (2018) repeated the criticism raised against the inclusion of GD in ICD-11 by Aarseth et al. (2017). We argue that this group of researchers fails to recognize the clinical and public health considerations, which support the WHO perspective. It is important to recognize a range of biases that may influence this debate; in particular, the gaming industry may wish to diminish its responsibility by claiming that GD is not a public health problem, a position which maybe supported by arguments from scholars based in media psychology, computer games research, communication science, and related disciplines. However, just as with any other disease or disorder in the ICD-11, the decision whether or not to include GD is based on clinical evidence and public health needs. Therefore, we reiterate our conclusion that including GD reflects the essence of the ICD and will facilitate treatment and prevention for those who need it.

Open access