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  • Author or Editor: L. Hangody x
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The goal of the study was to find a proper technique to fix tendon grafts into an INSTRON loading machine. From 8 human cadavers, 40 grafts were collected. We removed the bone-patella tendon-bone grafts, the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons, the quadriceps tendon-bone grafts, the Achilles tendons, and the peroneus longus tendons from each lower extremity. We tested the tendon grafts with five different types of fixation devices: surgical thread (Premicron 3), general mounting clamp, wire mesh, cement fixation, and a modified clamp for an INSTRON loading machine. The mean failure load in case of surgical thread fixation was (381N ± 26N). The results with the general clamp were (527N ± 45N). The wire meshes were more promising (750N ± 21N), but did not reach the outcomes we desired. Easy slippages of the ends of the tendons from the cement encasements were observed (253N ± 18N). We then began to use Shi’s clamp that could produce 977N ± 416N peak force. We combined Shi’s clamp with freezing of the graft and the rupture of the tendon itself demonstrated an average force of 2198 N ± 773N. We determined that our modified frozen clamp fixed the specimens against high tensile forces.

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An 11-year-old, Hungarian half-bred stallion was presented with a history of mixed left hindlimb lameness of 6 months duration. Subchondral bone cyst of the medial femoral condyle and injury of the medial meniscus were diagnosed. Osteochondral autograft transplantation (mosaic arthroplasty) was performed, taking grafts from the less weight-bearing medial border of the medial femoral trochlea of the affected limb, and transplanting them into the cyst during arthroscopy. The lameness was evaluated prior to and one year after the operation with a motion analysis system during treadmill exercise. Considerable improvement of the lameness and the clinical signs as well as successful transplantation of the grafts, and a new hard joint cartilage surface of the medial femoral condyle could be detected during follow-up arthroscopy. Osteochondral autograft transplantation seems to bee a possible alternative for treating subchondral cystic lesions of the medial femoral condyle in horses. A new technique for the surgical treatment of a subchondral cystic lesion of the medial femoral condyle in the horse is described.

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Six pieces of grafts, 6.5 mm in diameter, 20 mm in length, were taken from each of 170 cadaver hindlimbs, using the cranial surface of the medial femoral trochlea for harvesting. The age of the horses varied between 4 months and 23 years. 30 limbs under the age of 12 years were selected for transplantation. Three of six grafts were transplanted into the medial femoral condyle using different combinations of tunnel depth and dilation. With ageing, a significant decline in transplantability was detected. In general, mosaicplasty cannot be recommended in horses above 11 years. Based on a previous clinical case (Bodo et al., 2000), a good surface alignment was indeed achieved with a combination of graft length drilling and dilation in most cases. However, the occasional entrapment of cartilage debris under the graft prevented perfect alignment in the present cadaver study in 27% of the grafts transplanted in this manner. Since the protrusion of grafts never exceeded 1.5 mm, we conclude that drilling 3–5 mm deeper than graft length with graft length deep dilation can avoid disadvantageous protrusion of the transplanted hyaline cartilage caps, achieving bone decompression at the same time.

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