Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: L. Welch x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search

Summary  

{\rtf1\ansi\ansicpg1250\deff0\deflang1038\deflangfe1038\deftab708{\fonttbl{\f0\froman\fprq2\fcharset238{\*\fname Times New Roman;}Times New Roman CE;}} \viewkind4\uc1\pard\f0\fs24 We have developed a method for analyzing neutron activated sample data by using Microsoft Excel as the analysis engine. A simple technique for inputting data is based on report files generated by Canberra’s Genie-2000 spectroscopy system but could be easily modified to support other vendors having report formats with consistent text placement. A batch program handles operating an automatic sample changer, acquiring the data, and analyzing the spectrum to create a report of the peak locations and net area. The entire report is then transferred to within an Excel spreadsheet as the source data for neutron activation analysis. Unique Excel templates have been designed, for example, to accommodate short-lived and long-lived isotopes. This process provides us with a largely integrated solution to NAA while providing the results in an industry standard spreadsheet format. This software is ideally suited for teaching and training purposes. \par }

Restricted access

Abstract  

The Compton suppression system (CSS) has been thoroughly characterized at the University of Texas’ Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL). Effects of dead-time, sample displacement from primary detector, and primary energy detector position relative to the active shield detector have been measured and analyzed. Also, the applicability of Poisson counting statistics to Compton suppression spectroscopy has been evaluated.

Restricted access

Abstract

Background: The initial treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has generally been limited to serotonergic agents, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), or a combination of the two. These findings were supported by the POTS study for OCD in children and adolescents. However, treatment with serotonergic agents or CBT can take several weeks before benefit is seen; severe cases of OCD may require more immediate treatment. Case report: The authors present a case of severe OCD in an adolescent that required immediate treatment due to her critical medical condition. The patient's symptoms included not eating or taking medications or fluids by mouth due to fears of contamination. A medical hospitalization was previously required due to dehydration. As treatment with an SSRI would not have quick enough onset and the patient was initially resistant to participating in CBT, the patient was psychiatrically hospitalized and first started on liquid risperidone. After several doses of risperidone, the patient was able to participate in CBT and start sertraline. Discussion: The authors discuss the differential diagnosis of such a patient, including the continuum of OCD symptoms and psychotic symptoms. The authors discuss the different treatment options, including the utilization of inpatient psychiatric hospitalization. The authors discuss the potential risks and benefits of using atypical antipsychotics in lieu of benzodiazepines for the initial treatment of severe adolescent OCD. The authors also discuss other current treatment recommendations and rationale for the treatment that was pursued. Conclusions: This patient received benefit of her symptoms relatively quickly with psychiatric hospitalization and an atypical antipsychotic. The diagnosis of a psychotic disorder should be considered. These treatment options must be weighed against the risks of atypical antipsychotics, including extrapyramidal symptoms, weight gain, and metabolic syndrome; benzodiazepines also have their risks and benefits. Additionally, the cost of time and finances of inpatient hospitalization must be considered. More research is needed regarding the short- and long-term efficacy and safety of antipsychotics in the treatment of OCD in the child and adolescent population.

Open access

Summary  

In the past few years there has been renewed worldwide interest in the re-establishment of various nuclear and radiochemistry disciplines in the hope of training the next generation of skilled researchers in this area. In the United States there continues to be an acute shortage of MSc and PhD level trained students, particularly at the Department of Energy national laboratories. As a result of this critical need the Department of Energy established a Radiochemistry Education Award Program (REAP) in the late 1990's to address this issue. Several universities were awarded funding to establish various complimentary programs. One of the main goals of the REAP at the University of Texas was to establish a web-based graduate level course with associated labs and to have interactions with the national laboratories.

Restricted access
Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors: S. Landsberger, A. Plionis, S. Biegalski, K. Foltz-Biegalski, E. Schneider, D. O’Kelly, J. Braisted, S. O’Kelly, and L. Welch

Abstract  

Over the last three years we have developed a very robust nuclear and radiochemistry program at The University of Texas at Austin. The cornerstone of support was the DOE Radiochemistry Educational Award Program (REAP) that was awarded from 2002–2005. A second award for the period of 2005–2008 was just received. This award has enabled us to support many educational activities from vanguard classroom instruction, to laboratory enhancements, to research activities at the graduate and undergraduate levels. Both traditional radiochemistry and advanced topics in nuclear instrumentation have been supported. Various DOE university programs, national lab funding and IAEA fellowship grants, have allowed the Nuclear and Radiation Engineering Program at the University of Texas to be at the forefront of nuclear and radiochemistry educational and research activities and help secure the next generation of needed expertise.

Restricted access