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  • Author or Editor: Liwen Vaughan x
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Abstract  

Two previous webometrics studies found a relationship between the number of inlinks to a commercial site and the company's business performance measures. Thus inlink counts to commercial sites could be a potential source of business information. However, those studies examined top ranking information technology companies in the U.S. and China. Whether the above-mentioned relationship holds for all companies regardless of ranking and in other countries is unknown. The study reported in this paper investigated this question. The study includes all information technology companies in the U.S. and Canada and gathered both business performance data and website data for these companies. It found significant correlation between business performance measures and inlinks to the company websites. The correlation was still significant even after the size of the company and the website age were accounted for. The conclusion is robust to the search engine used for data collection. Data collection issues for webometrics research were also explored.

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Abstract

Websites of China's top 100 information technology (IT) companies were examined. Link count to a company's website was found to correlate with the company's revenue, profit, and research and development expenses. This suggests that Web hyperlinks to commercial sites can be a business performance indicator and thus a source of business information. This information is useful for Web business intelligence and Web data mining. As a comparison to IT companies, China's top 100 privately owned companies were also studied. No relationship between link count and the business performance measure was found for these companies due probably to the heterogeneous nature of this group. Data collection issues for webometrics research were also explored in the study.

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Abstract  

A sample of 1,483 publications, representative of the scholarly production of LIS faculty, was searched in Web of Science (WoS), Google, and Google Scholar. The median number of citations found through WoS was zero for all types of publications except book chapters; the median for Google Scholar ranged from 1 for print/subscription journal articles to 3 for books and book chapters. For Google the median number of citations ranged from 9 for conference papers to 41 for books. A sample of the web citations was examined and classified as representing intellectual or non-intellectual impact. Almost 92% of the citations identified through Google Scholar represented intellectual impact — primarily citations from journal articles. Bibliographic services (non-intellectual impact) were the largest single contributor of citations identified through Google. Open access journal articles attracted more web citations but the citations to print/subscription journal articles more often represented intellectual impact. In spite of problems with Google Scholar, it has the potential to provide useful data for research evaluation, especially in a field where rapid and fine-grained analysis is desirable.

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Scientometrics
Authors: Liwen Vaughan and Wolfgang Glänzel

Summary  

The objective of the present study is twofold: (1) to show the aims and means of quantitative interpretation of bibliographic features in bibliometrics and their re-interpretation in research policy, and (2) to summarise the state-of-art in self-citation research. The authors describe three approaches to the role of author self-citations and possible conflicts arising from the different perspectives. From the bibliometric viewpoint we can conclude that that there is no reason for condemning self-citations in general or for removing them from macro or meso statistics; supplementary indicators based on self-citations are, nonetheless, useful to understand communication patterns.

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Summary  

Based on the findings from earlier studies which showed that links to business Websites contain useful business information, we examined the feasibility of using Web co-link data to compare business competitive positions. We hypothesized that the number of co-links to a pair of business Websites is a measure of the similarity between the two companies. Since similar or related businesses are competing businesses, the co-link data can be used to map business competitive positions. We selected 32 telecommunications companies for the study and collected co-link data to these companies from Yahoo!. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis on the co-link data correctly mapped these companies into telecommunications industry sectors. This proved our hypothesis and further confirmed the theory that links to business Websites can be objects for Web data mining. We collected data in a way that would reflect two markets, the global market and the Chinese market. Results from the two data sets revealed the competitive positions of the companies in the two markets. We propose that regular data collection and analysis based on this method can be used to monitor the business competitive environment and trigger early warnings on the change of the competitive landscape.

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Abstract  

Building on a previous study that succeeded in mapping business competition positions at an industry level using Web co-link analysis, the current study attempted to improve Web co-link analysis by adding Web page content to obtain the mapping at a particular market segment level. This method combines the ideas of Web content mining with Web structure mining. The method was tested in the WiMAX sector of the telecommunication industry. Specifically, the keyword WiMAX was incorporated into queries that searched for co-links to pairs of company Websites. Two sets of data were collected: one with the proposed method and one with co-link search alone. The resulting two data matrices were analyzed using multidimensional scaling (MDS) to generate maps of business competition. The comparison between the two maps shows that the proposed method produced a map focusing on the WiMAX sector. The study also proposed the measure of reduction of co-link count that can be used to gauge the effectiveness of focusing the analysis on a particular sector. The reduction of co-link count could also be an easy and pragmatic measure for an analysis of a company’s competitiveness in a particular market segment.

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Abstract

The study explored the feasibility of using Web keyword analysis as an alternative to link analysis and tested the feasibility in a multi-industry environment. The keyword is the organization's name, in this case the company name. American companies from five industries were included in the study. The study found that the Web visibility of a company as measured by the number of Webpages on which the company name appears correlates with the company's business measures (revenue, profits, and assets). The correlation coefficients are similar to that between the inlink counts and the business measures. This suggests that the keyword count (searched by the company name) could replace inlink count as an alternative indicator of some commonly used business measures. The co-word (the co-occurrence of the names of two companies on Webpages) count was used as a measure of the relatedness of the two companies. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis was applied to the co-word matrices and generated MDS maps that showed relationships among companies in a multi-industry context. Keyword data were collected from three different types of Websites (general Websites, blog sites, and Web news sites) and results were compared. The study found blog sites to be the better source to collect data for this type of study. The comparison of MDS maps generated from co-link data and the blog co-word data showed that the co-word analysis is as effective as co-link analysis in mapping business relationships. The value of the study is not limited to the business sector as the co-word method could be applied to analysing relationships among other types of organizations.

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Abstract  

This study examined why Websites were co-linked using Canadian university Websites as the test set. Pages that co-linked to these university Websites were located using Yahool. A random sample of 859 co-linking pages (the page that initiated the co-link) was retrieved and the contents of the page, as well as the context of the link, were manually examined to record the following variables: language, country, type of Website, and the reasons for co-linking. The study found that in over 94% of cases, the two co-linked universities were related academically; many of these cases (38%) showed a relationship specifically in teaching or research. This confirms results, from previous quantitative studies, that Web co-links can be a measure of the similarity or relatedness of sites being co-linked and that Web co-link analysis can thus be used to study relationships among linked Websites.

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Summary  

Motivations for the creation of hyperlinks to business sites were analyzed through a content analysis approach. Links to 280 North American IT companies (71 Canadian companies and 209 U.S. companies) were searched through Yahoo!. Then a random sample of 808 links was taken from the links retrieved. The content as well as the context of each link was manually examined to determine why the link was created. The country location and the type of the site where the link came from were also identified. The study found that most links were created for business purposes confirming findings from early quantitative studies that links contain useful business information. Links to competitors were extremely rare but competitors were often co-linked, suggesting that co-link analysis is the direction to pursue for information on competitive intelligence.

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