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Béla Bartók's collection of Hungarian instrumental folk music is known only for the Hungarian Bartók scholars and ethnomusicologists although Bartók's permanent interest in folk musical instruments, and instruments in general, manifesting itself in essays and compositions has always been evident. The term Bartók's instrumental collection implies the Hungarian instrumental folk music material that emerged as the outcome of his own collecting work and explicitly melodies performed on instruments. This report gives a survey of Bartók's work in the field by means of some randomly chosen phenomena.

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Benjamin Rajeczky's research covers Gregorian chant and folk music.The long ist of his books and studies, the publications he edited and the reviews he wrote provide conclusive evidence of the wide range of his interests in both spheres.

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Folk Song: Tradition, Revival, and Re-Creation. Edited by Ian Russel and David Atkinson

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Die Instrumentalmusik spielt noch heute eine Rolle bei den ungarischen Totenzeremonien. Trotz starkem Schwund weist die traditionelle Bauernkultur auch auf diesem Gebiet Veränderungen auf. Davon kündet der Einsatz von Instrumenten bei der Totenwache. Die zunehmende Einbeziehung von Zigeunerkapellen bei Zigeunerbegräbnissen, und zwar nicht mehr nur bei namhaften Zigeunermusikern, bedeutet eine Übernahme älterer ungarischer Bräuche. Das Instrumentarium ist zwar nicht streng festgelegt, aber doch ziemlich begrenzt. Am weitesten verbreitet sind Zigeuner- und Blaskapelle oder eine Mischung der beiden. Die Melodien, die bei Beerdigungen gespielt werden, sind recht einheitlich, tragen aber verschiedene Namen. Neben den speziellen Melodien hat das Lieblingslied des Verstorbenen die größte Bedeutung im Repertoire.

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Manners of performance by Hungarian village- and town gypsy musicians in historical recordings . The paper describes the different elements of the performance: ornamentation, vibrato, improvisation, intensity of sound, tempo, register, pizzicato, etc. Musical examples are from the first period of the 20th century, from material of the Folk Music Department and Sound-Archiv of the Institute for Musicology of the HAS. The topic is structured as follows: short history of the instrumental music fieldworks: phonograph recordings and (later) 78 rpm shall-lack discs with instrumental music (peasants and gypsy musicians). The early recording-firms published discs as soon as in the 1910–20-ies with the most favourite contemporary ensembles (I. Magyari, B. Radics). Contemporary references describe their performance which was robust but full with nobility, graciosity, glittering viruosity, rich fantasy dynamism. The differences are clear among the two social strata (peasants and gypsy musicians), when performers play the same melody: one as dance music (in the villages) and one as restaurant music (only to hear) in the town. Some elements (like pizzicato) are used alone (or nearly exclusively) by gypsies, others are common features of the performance.

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Acta Ethnographica Hungarica
Authors: Katalin Paksa, Lujza Tari, Orsolya Gyöngyössy, Mária Domokos, Vilmos Voigt, and Sándor Varga
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