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Abstract

We are exposing a differential diagnostic problem in the case report of a young female with the diagnosis of atrial fibrillation who was referred to our Institute for pulmonary vein isolation. Based on the 12-lead ECG we found an unusal mechanism resulting in irregular, narrow QRS tachycardia, which was also confirmed by an electrophysiological study.

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Authors: N Szegedi, E Zima, M Clemens, A Szekely, RG Kiss, G Szeplaki, L Geller, B Merkely, Z Csanadi and G Duray

Background

Catheter ablation is a proven therapy of focal atrial tachycardia. However limited information is available about the additional value of electroanatomical over conventional mapping methods for this specific arrhythmia.

Methods

Consecutive catheter ablation procedures of FAT were analyzed in two cardiology centres. Only conventional mapping was used in 30 of the 60 procedures whereas additionally CARTO mapping was performed in another 30 procedures. Acute, six-month success rate, and procedural data were analyzed.

Results

Localization of ectopic foci is congruent with previously published data. There was no statistically significant difference between procedure time and fluoroscopy time using additionally CARTO mapping, compared to conventional mapping only. Acute success rate was higher in procedures guided by CARTO mapping than in procedures based on conventional mapping (27/30 vs. 18/30, p = 0.0081). During the 6-month follow-up period there was a better outcome (p = 0.045) in case of CARTO guided procedures (success: 11 cases, partial success: 12 cases, failure: 4 cases) compared to conventional mapping (success: 4 cases, partial success: 18 cases, failure: 7 cases).

Conclusions

Catheter ablation of focal atrial tachycardias using the CARTO electroanatomical mapping system seems to provide higher acute and 6-month success rate compared to ablation using conventional mapping methods only.

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