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  • Author or Editor: M. Pogány x
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Fatty acid hydroperoxide-producing lipoxygenase (LOX) and hydroperoxide-degrading glutathione peroxidase (GPOX) enzyme activities were studied in leaves of virus resistant Xanthi-nc and susceptible Samsun-nn tobacco cultivars after inoculation with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Total LOX activity showed a maximum at pH 5.5 in cell-free extracts of uninfected leaves. LOX activity markedly increased at this pH after TMV inoculation, but a substantial induction was detected also in the basic pH range with an emerging peak around pH = 8.5. TMV-elicited LOX induction was weaker and appeared later in Samsun-nn than in Xanthi-nc leaves. GPOX activity was also substantially induced by TMV infection. However, this induction appeared only 4 days post-inoculation in resistant Xanthi-nc plants in tissues surrounding the localized necrotic lesions. In contrast, GPOX activity did not change in TMV-inoculated, susceptible Samsun-nn leaves. Several glutathione S-transferase (GST) isoenzymes also display GPOX activity. The expression of a tau class GST gene was markedly induced by TMV inoculation in Xanthi-nc leaves. This tobacco GST gene was partially cloned and sequenced.

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Biotic and abiotic stresses induce increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through distinct pathways: pathogen infections activate specific ROS-producing enzymes (i.e. NADPH oxidase, cell wall peroxidases), which results in accumulation of cellular or intercellular ROS, such as superoxide or hydrogen peroxide. Abiotic stresses, on the other hand, cause elevated ROS production principally through an impairment of photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport pathways. Also, these two types of stresses have diverse effects on the antioxidant system of the plant. Results of experiments studying the interaction of abiotic and biotic stresses largely depend on the degree of the applied abiotic stress treatment, the compatible or incompatible host-pathogen interaction and the timing of inoculation in relation to the timing of a preceding abiotic stress treatment.

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Treatment with various concentrations (0, 5, 15 and 20%) of PEG was used to simulate water stress, followed by inoculation with Drechslera tritici-repentis (DTR) at two different points of time (6 and 72 h after the PEG treatment) in two DTR resistant (M-3 and Mv Magvas) and two sensitive (Bezostaya 1 and Glenlea) wheat varieties. The reduction in biomass production due to the PEG treatments was more pronounced in the shoots than in the roots. While in the case of Bezostaya 1 5% PEG reduced the level of infection, 20% PEG treatment lowered the tolerance level of M-3. DTR infection may be more efficient in inducing antioxidative defence systems than water stress. However, there was no direct correlation between the activity of the individual antioxidant enzymes and the drought or DTR tolerance of wheat plants.

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Abstract  

The regional distribution of copper and other trace elements was determined in the brain of a patient deceased in Wilson's disease against a control brain. The heterogeneous distribution of copper was checked by scanning electron microscope equipped with an X-ray microanalyzer.

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