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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors:
W. Hensley
,
A. McKinnon
,
H. Miley
,
M. Panisko
, and
R. Savard

Abstract  

A computer code has been written at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to synthesize the results of typical gamma-ray spectroscopy experiments. The code, dubbed SYNTH1, allows users to specify physical characteristics of a gamma-ray source, the quantity of the nuclides producing the radiation, the source-to-detector distance, the type and thickness of absorbers, the size and composition of the detector (Ge or NaI), and the electronic set up used to gather the data. In the process of specifying the parameters needed to synthesize a spectrum, several interesting intermediate results are produced, including a photopeak transmission function vs. energy, a detector efficiency curve, and a weighted list of gamma and x rays produced from a set of nuclides. All of these intermediate results are available for graphical inspection and for printing. SYNTH runs on personal computers, is menu driven and can be customized to user specifications. SYNTH contains robust support for coaxial germanium detectors and some support for sodium iodide detectors. SYNTH is not a finished product. A number of additional developments are planned. However, the existing code has been carefully compared to spectra obtained from National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) certified standards with very favorable results.

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Fusarium head blight (FHB) of oat in western Canada was determined to be caused by a complex of Fusarium species, the composition and proportions of which varied considerably among years, and between Manitoba and Saskatchewan, the two main oat production regions (provinces) in western Canada. The levels of deoxynivalenol (DON), associated with Fusarium graminearum infection, were considerably higher in oat than in wheat and especially in barley, when levels of DON were compared to those of F. graminearum on seed, suggesting that oat may stimulate production of the mycotoxin by this causal species during the infection process, compared to that in other cereals. Testing of oat cultivars and lines for reaction to FHB indicated that while differences existed, these were relatively small. ‘Naked’ oats, in general, were more resistant. Several of the exotic oat accessions tested appeared to have superior levels of resistance and these are being used as parents in crosses to improve resistance in adapted, high quality oats.

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Cereal Research Communications
Authors:
A. Comeau
,
F. Langevin
,
V. Caetano
,
S. Haber
,
M. Savard
,
H. Voldeng
,
G. Fedak
,
Y. Dion
,
S. Rioux
,
J. Gilbert
,
D. Somers
, and
R. Martin

It has proven to be an enduring and difficult challenge to generate useful germplasm that resists fusarium head blight (FHB) as effectively as Sumai 3. While focussed genetic approaches may follow a clear path to a well-defined goal of resistance, they run the risk of worsening traits not selected for. It was commonly believed that selecting for good performance under pressure from multiple diseases plus abiotic stress should be a harder task than focussing on the single goal of FHB resistance; and yet the complex, systemic approaches have now been shown to be capable of rapid progress. Moreover, the risks of worsening non-selected traits are lessened, because the selection matrices favour genes, or groups of genes, that are free of major defects arising from linkage or pleiotropy. However, even at the pre-breeding level, environments are needed that stress the tested germplasm abiotically and with multiple diseases, as a broad array of traits must be examined at the same time. Since as much as 98–99% of any population may need to be discarded, the widest possible genetic range of diversity should be investigated. As seen in several bread wheat examples, the critical factors that allow for rapid selection of germplasm resistant to most stresses are: a) use of an extensive range of available biodiversity; b) well-designed planning of numerous crosses; c) the astute application of combinations of biotic and abiotic stresses; and d) fast recycling of multiple-resistant lines into crossing blocks. Analyses of our first attempts (2003–07) with such systemic approaches show that as early as F1-F3, germplasm with minimal defects and resistant to the multiple biotic and abiotic stresses can be selected. This ability to identify and advance trait packages rather than just individual traits also improves efficiency for breeders. The selected germplasm resisted well all diseases of concern in Eastern Canada: FHB, barley yellow dwarf (BYD), rusts, powdery mildew, leaf spots, and root diseases. The best (e.g. FL62R1) had FHB resistance near equivalent to Sumai 3 while displaying good yield potential and agronomic traits. Milling quality still falls short of desired levels, but was a good improvement over Sumai 3. The systemic approach, so described because it integrates the pursuit of multiple traits in complex environments, has now demonstrated, in a Canadian setting, the success achieved earlier in Brazil. This confirmation and extension of the utility of systemic approaches support the case for their wider application.

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