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Abstract  

The formation of125IO3 ions in the course of labeling proteins with125I by the use of the Chloramine-T method has been investigated. It was demonstrated that one of the components of the labeling reaction mixture is125IO3 . The identification of radio-iodate ions was performed by the use of paper electrophoresis.

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: I. Dalmadi and M. Tóth-Markus
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The metamorphic basement of the Pannonian Basin consists of uplifted highs and deep sub-basins among them. One of the best-known highs is the so-called Szeghalom Dome, which is surrounded by less intensely explored ones. The eastern neighbour, the Mezõsas-Furta Dome (MFD), is studied in this paper. Based on detailed petrologic investigation, six main lithologies are distinguished for the MFD, which can be well compared to those described previously for the Szeghalom Dome. All these rock types (orthogneiss, mafic-ultramafic xenolith, granite, sillimanite-biotite gneiss, garnet-bearing amphibolite, amphibole-biotite gneiss) are classified into three main units based on different metamorphic and deformation history. Understanding their relative spatial position permitted the elaboration of geologic map and sections of the MFD

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The Variscan metamorphic basement of the Great Hungarian Plain (Tisza Block, E Hungary) consists of deeply buried crystalline highs comprising several types of gneiss and metabasic rocks. A common gneiss type is an orthogneiss variety that can be followed across the basement from Jánoshalma northeastward within the Tisza Block. We believe the Jánoshalma High to be a uniform orthogneiss block of peraluminous composition; this is suggested by the presence of idiomorphic accessory phases (apatite needles, zircon), polygonal feldspar texture, occurrence of rock bodies of exotic origin, xenoliths (amphibolite, eclogite) and xenocrysts (feldspar megacrysts, amphibole, garnet) of varying composition and metamorphic evolution. The peculiar features of the orthogneiss body are indicative of processes that may have taken place in an ancient Alaskan-type orogenic belt (subduction-accretionary complex). In these situations, because of the continuous ample sediment supply, the accretionary prism retreats oceanward, forming structures of increasing steepness with depth, accreting against the continental margin. Thereafter, this causes oceanward retreat of the subduction trench as well. For this reason mantle-derived magmas do not penetrate the continental margin but the accretionary prism itself, resulting in the melting of its material. In the case of the Jánoshalma High, following the emplacement of the onetime granodioritic body at shallower crustal levels, it metamorphosed via to a two-stage overprint. An early high-temperature (HT) and a succeeding medium-temperature (MT) event formed orthogneiss from the ancient intrusive rock. This is the first detailed investigation of the Jánoshalma high that has been published.

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Abstract

The Kiskunhalas-NE (KIHA-NE) fractured hydrocarbon reservoir is part of the structurally rather complex crystalline basement of the Great Hungarian Plain. In the course of petrologic and thermometric examinations various rock types of the investigated area have been classified and characterized. There are four basic lithological units in the area. In the lowest structural position orthogneiss is common, which according to its petrographic features is assumed to be identical to the orthogneiss body of the adjacent Jánoshalma (JH) basement high (metamorphic peak temperature T < 580 °C according to Zachar and M. Tóth 2004). The next rock unit upward is the highly mylonitized variety of the orthogneiss with textural features suggesting deformation in an extensional stress regime. In the higher section of the mylonite zone graphitic gneiss mylonite is characteristic, with a peak metamorphic T of 410±45 °C. The lithology in the shallowest position of the area is a graphitic carbonate phyllite, with a T of 375 ± 15 °C. Estimation of the deformation temperature for both mylonitic rocks results in approximately Tdef ∼ 455 °C. All data together suggest that between the top (graphitic carbonate phyllite) and the bottom (orthogneiss) of the ideal rock column there is about 200 °C peak metamorphic temperature deviation. The two extreme metamorphic blocks probably became juxtaposed along an extensional fault zone in the basement at approximately 15 km depth.

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In field screening tests conducted on selected pest scarabaeids in Hungary, Epicometis (Tropinota) hirta (subfamily Cetoniinae) was attracted to traps baited with either cinnamyl alcohol or trans-anethol. In some tests attraction was also detected to phenethyl alcohol or cinnamyl acetate. In other tests, adults of Cetonia aurata aurata and Oxythyrea funesta (subfamily Cetoniinae) also were attracted to trans-anethol, while the ternary mixture of phenethyl propionate, eugenol and geraniol attracted Potosia cuprea (subfamily Cetoniinae). Some attraction of Valgus hemipterus (subfamily Valginae) to cinnamyl alcohol also was observed. All of the above species are pests of more or less economic importance in Hungary. The attractant chemicals discovered in the present study will form a starting point for the development of effective attractants for the respective pest scarab species.

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Galactosaemia is a rare, life-threatening inborn error. It is treated by life-long galactose restriction. People with galactose intolerance cannot consume milk and milk products. The aim of this work was to produce fermented milk products with low galactose content. Lactose hydrolysed milk and two types of mixture of lactose hydrolysed milk supplemented with galactose free nutriments (Pregomin and Nutrilon) were fermented in a 2:1 ratio. For fermentation traditional kefir culture (Lactococcus lactis sp. lactis + Lactococcus lactis sp. cremoris + Lactobacillus casei + Lactobacillus kefir + Candida kefir) was used. Number of viable cells, pH and galactose level were measured. Data were evaluated by one-way analysis of variance and t-test. Level of galactose reduction was measured by UV spectrometry for the determination of lactose and D-galactose in foodstuffs (Boehringer Mannheim enzyme test). Galactose content was below 200 mg/100 cm3 in the mixtures of lactose hydrolysed milk and galactose free nutriments after 48 h of fermentation. So, the kefir-like products based on mixed milk with nutriments are suitable for use in the diet of patients suffering from galactosaemia.

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The aim of dogrose breeding for fruit purposes is to select genotypes suitable for cultivation and to produce new genotypes by crossing. Physical and chemical analyses, prospective genotypes have been developed from R. inodora , R. corymbifera, R. rubiginosa and R. canina varieties.In the course of the investigations, the highest vitamin C content was found in the hips of R. inodora and R. rubiginosa . The glucose and fructose contents ranged from 9.57–13.36 g/100 g, averaged over several years. The amounts of these two carbohydrates were equal, or in some taxa (e.g. R. corymbifera, R. canina Sz3) the fructose content was higher.The glucose, fructose and vitamin C contents changed at different rates in each taxon during ripening. The results showed that the fructose content reached its peak a week earlier than the glucose content. The vitamin C content of morphological varieties of R. canina did not change substantially during ripening.

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Sticky “cloak” traps (CSALOMON® PAL) baited with the synthetic pheromone racemic 1,7-dioxaspiro[5.5]undecane were most efficient among the trap designs tested for catching male olive fly Bactrocera (Dacus) oleae Gmelin (Diptera, Tephritidae) in field tests in Croatia. Colour cues did not influence male catches. Consequently transparent sticky “cloak” traps baited with pheromone appear to be the best choice for detection and monitoring of males of the olive fly in Croatia. Female flies did not respond to the pheromone, however, were weakly attracted to the visual cues of yellow and fluorescent yellow.

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